united states – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 01:26:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://4xcircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg united states – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ 32 32 Winners of the National Book Critics Circle Awards https://4xcircle.com/winners-of-the-national-book-critics-circle-awards/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 01:26:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/winners-of-the-national-book-critics-circle-awards/ Price The National Circle of Book Critics Awards 2022 If you purchase linked books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores. Honoree Fanonne Jeffers, Anthony Veasna So and Clint Smith are among seven winners of this year’s National Book Critics Circle Awards for work published in […]]]>

Price

The National Circle of Book Critics Awards 2022

If you purchase linked books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores.

Honoree Fanonne Jeffers, Anthony Veasna So and Clint Smith are among seven winners of this year’s National Book Critics Circle Awards for work published in 2021, announced Thursday at a virtual awards ceremony by the book critics organization. American books.

Jeffers won the fiction award for “The Love Songs of WEB Du Bois,” his first novel about black history and coming of age in the South.

“It’s a complete shock,” Jeffers said, covering his mouth in disbelief and wiping tears from his eyes when Jane Ciabattari, the chair of the fiction committee, announced his name. “I didn’t want to be cute, I was just going to wear a T-shirt.”

Through tears, Jeffers thanked the “dear Georgian women of my maternal line,” including his mother and his late sister; the historians and writers “who provided the backbone of this book”; WEB Dubois, “whose spirit has hopefully blessed this book”; and Oprah Winfrey for choosing the novel for her book club. “[She] spoke my name with grace and kindness and completely changed my life for the better.

So, who died in December 2020, was awarded the John Leonard First Book Award, presented for his posthumous collection of short stories, “Afterparties”. The book follows a community of Cambodian Americans living primarily in California’s Central Valley and deals with reincarnation, legacy trauma from the Khmer Rouge era, homosexuality, and the intricacies of family life. The judges praised “Afterparties” for its “vigor, originality and good humor” and expressed their condolences. “CCNB joins So’s loved ones and readers in celebrating his work and mourning his loss.”

Accepting the award on So’s behalf was his sister, Samantha So Lamb. “After my brother’s death, [the team at Ecco] really wrapped around us, including me, my family,” she said, her voice cracking with emotion. “My brother is a superstar, and our team made sure of that. I am grateful that my brother was able to share his voice and uplift the Cambodian American and LGBTQ communities before his passing.

Smith received the non-fiction award for “How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning With the History of Slavery Across America,” a work that explores the legacy of slavery and its lasting effect on the history of the United States. United.

“When I wrote this book, I decided to try to write a book that I needed when I was 16, sitting in my American history class,” Smith said in his speech. “I think of Clint, 16, today, sitting in that American history class, and I think of my grandfather’s grandfather, who was born a slave. And I also think of Toni Morrison, whom we invoked this evening and which has always been in my mind and in my heart.

The poetry prize went to Diane Seuss for “frank: sonnets,” a deeply personal collection that explores the author’s life and her search for some semblance of “beauty or relief.” In the biography category, Rebecca Donner won “All Troubles Frequent Today: The True Story of the American Woman at the Heart of Germany’s Resistance to Hitler.” At its center is Donner’s great-great-aunt, Mildred Harnack, an American executed by the Nazis for leading an underground resistance group in Germany during World War II.

Jeremy Atherton Lin won the autobiography prize for ‘Gay Bar: Why Went Out’, a transatlantic tour of the gay bars that shaped the author’s queer identity, which blends memoir, criticism and history. In the critical category, Melissa Febos won for “Girlhood,” a collection of stories about the values ​​that shape girls and the women they become. The judges called it “an incisive and vibrant critique of what it means to grow up as a woman.”

Author and literary critic Merve Emre and author and distinguished USC professor Percival Everett were also honored at the event as recipients of the Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing and the Ivan Sandrof, respectively. Lifetime Achievement Award. The Cave Canem Foundation was also honored by receiving the first Toni Morrison Achievement Award.

The full list of finalists:

Autobiography
Hanif Abdurraqib, “A Little Devil in America: Notes to Glory of Black Performance”
Jeremy Atherton Lin, “Gay Bar: Why We Dated”
Rodrigo Garcia, “Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes: Memoirs of a Son of Gabriel García Márquez and Mercedes Barcha”
Doireann Ní Ghríofa, “A Ghost in the Throat”
Albert Samaha, “Concepcion: the fortune of an immigrant family”

Biography
Susan Bernofsky, “Clairvoyant of the Little Ones: The Life of Robert Walser”
Keisha N. Blain, “Until I’m Free: Fannie Lou Hamer’s Enduring Message to America”
Rebecca Donner, “All Troubles Frequent Today: The True Story of the American Woman at the Heart of German Resistance to Hitler”
Mark Harris, “Mike Nichols: A Lifetime”
Alexander Nemerov, “Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York”

Critical
Melissa Febos, “Daughter”
Jenny Diski, “Why Didn’t You Just Do What You Were Told?: Essays”
Jesse McCarthy, “Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul?: Essays”
Mark McGurl, “Everything and Less: The Novel in the Age of Amazon”
Amia Srinivasan, “The Right to Sex: Feminism in the 21st Century”

fiction
Joshua Cohen, “The Netanyahus”
Rachel Cusk, “Second Place”
Sarah Hall, “burnt coat”
Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, “The Love Songs of WEB Du Bois”
Colson Whitehead, “Harlem Shuffle”

nonfiction
Patrick Radden Keefe, “Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty”
Joshua Prager, “The Family Roe: An American Story”
Sam Quinones, “The Least of Us: True Stories of America and Hope in the Age of Fentanyl and Meth”
Clint Smith, “How the Word Got Around: An Account with the History of Slavery Across America”
Rebecca Solnit, “Orwell’s Roses”

Poetry
BK Fischer, “Ceive”
Donika Kelly, “Renunciations: Poems”
Rajiv Mohabir, “Cutlish”
Cheswayo Mphanza, “The Rinehart Executives”
Diane Seuss, “Frank: Sonnets”

John Leonard Award
Ashley C. Ford, “Someone’s Daughter: A Memoir”
Jocelyn Nicole Johnson, “My Monticello: Fiction”
Torrey Peters, “Detransition, Baby”
Larissa Pham, “Pop Song: Adventures in Art and Intimacy”
Anthony Veasna So, “Afterparties: Stories”
Devon Walker-Figueroa, “Philomath: Poems”


Source link

]]>
Funding Circle: Small Business Spotlight – face value https://4xcircle.com/funding-circle-small-business-spotlight-face-value/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 11:24:10 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/funding-circle-small-business-spotlight-face-value/ A makeup student who started with a makeup booth at a festival has turned her passion into a fashion label with a host of celebrity fans – including Margot Robbie, Nicole Scherzinger and Pixie Lott. Madeline Griffiths, 38, started at the trendy Secret Garden Party in 2013 and her eye-catching sequins and jewelry quickly started […]]]>

A makeup student who started with a makeup booth at a festival has turned her passion into a fashion label with a host of celebrity fans – including Margot Robbie, Nicole Scherzinger and Pixie Lott.

Madeline Griffiths, 38, started at the trendy Secret Garden Party in 2013 and her eye-catching sequins and jewelry quickly started getting word of mouth.

She poured all her savings into the project and went for years without making a profit before taking on a business partner – 28-year-old festival client Roisin Cusack.

The pair – who can also count Kylie Minogue, Georgia Toffolo, Cara Delavigne, Maya Jama and Noel Fielding among their fans – now have a range of products from ASOS, Boots and Selfridges.

And now, after successful collaborations with Nike and Southern Comfort, the company is set to expand to the United States.

She says: “People kept saying ‘you have to make a business of it’. It was very hard work and for a long time I had less money than when I was a student.

“Then I thought ‘what if I designed products and made them right?’

“We started making money doing the mobile beauty services mostly at big parties and events around London, including at Google and YouTube.

“We were even approached by Richard Branson’s family to host their parties.

“Building the business as a service was going to be very staff intensive and difficult to grow, but I was always interested in creating products so anyone could buy them online and do the looks themselves at home. House.”

Inspired by positive feedback from festival-goers, it entered the retail market in 2015 with the help of Funding Circle, the UK’s largest small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) lending platform.

Soon after entering the market, In Your Dreams went from strength to strength, securing lucrative deals with retail giants such as ASOS, Forever 21, Selfridges and Boots.

Year after year, the company continued to expand, hiring three full-time employees and around fifty freelancers.

But the coronavirus pandemic has brought the business to a halt, hitting the events and entertainment business that In Your Dreams relies on so heavily.

Madeline said: “All of our makeup artists had virtually no jobs. These people received no help because many of them were self-employed.

“I was trying to stay positive throughout. I kept thinking things were going to change, and that’s probably what kept me going.

“I was trying to think of ways to create new products or collaborate with people, but the company’s cash flow pretty much stopped.

“Essentially what happened is we had to start over from the beginning, but we have this cash flow and we have these relationships and these customers. We are now ready to launch into the American market this summer.”

ASOS has pledged to double its orders, the company is looking to hire five more full-time staff, bringing the total to eight, and Madeline is hoping to secure a six-figure investment in the business.

To ease their cash flow burdens and keep pace with growing demand, In Your Dreams is considering taking out another loan through Funding Circle.

She added: “We’re overwhelmed with work, but it’s really hard to run a business without the cash. We haven’t gone out and had no time to create new professional emails, but we’ve been approached by five or six major retailers in Feb. alone.

“We have already been confirmed at Glastonbury, Wilderness and Secret Garden Party this year.”

The recovery some small businesses across the UK have enjoyed is reflected in Funding Circle’s new economic impact report, which found that more than 80% of small or medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) were confident in their long-term future. term in November 2021.

The report, produced by Oxford Economics, also showed that the percentage of SMEs intending to expand has doubled since the second quarter of 2020 and is now at pre-pandemic levels.

In 2021, Funding Circle loans are estimated to have contributed £7.2bn to the UK economy and supported over 100,000 jobs.


Source link

]]>
More Hamilton County residents are turning in circles https://4xcircle.com/more-hamilton-county-residents-are-turning-in-circles/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 10:39:57 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/more-hamilton-county-residents-are-turning-in-circles/ Carmel may be the hijacked capital of the United States, but other suburbs in Hamilton County are rapidly gaining. Increasingly, Fishers, Noblesville and Westfield build roundabouts when intersection improvements come due, either due to increased traffic, disrepair, road projects or new developments in the area. Examples abound throughout the department, where 290 roundabouts have been […]]]>

Carmel may be the hijacked capital of the United States, but other suburbs in Hamilton County are rapidly gaining.

Increasingly, Fishers, Noblesville and Westfield build roundabouts when intersection improvements come due, either due to increased traffic, disrepair, road projects or new developments in the area.

Examples abound throughout the department, where 290 roundabouts have been built or are planned.

The reconstruction of State Route 37 via Fishers will include three roundabout exits. Noblesville is building roundabouts at five intersections as part of its reconstruction of Pleasant Street. Westfield sets up a roundabout at East Street during its widening of State Road 32.

Slowly :‘These poles are hideous’: Amid landlord opposition, Fishers 5G installation slows

“With Carmel pushing roundabouts so soon, Hamilton County drivers have gotten used to it, seen they are safe and have become more comfortable and accept to them,” said Noblesville engineer Alison Krupski.

Carmel, which built its first roundabout in 2001, now has 141. Carmel has so many, in fact, that there are only 15 intersections left without one. But Noblesville has 34 with 13 more planned and Westfield has 23 roundabouts with seven in progress.

Fishers has 22 roundabouts but plans to add 32 by 2040. And the suburb recently announced it would build a roundabout at one of its busiest intersections – 96th Street and Allisonville Road – to replace a Michigan left turn.

‘It was time’ :Fishers U-turn to Michigan’s left; upcoming change at 96th street intersection

Mayor Scott Fadness said city engineers determined a two-lane roundabout could handle the 55,000 cars a day crossing the crossing with shorter wait times than a standard intersection. .



Source link

]]>
Next step, Sylvia Plath! Why it’s time to redesign the London Underground map | International Women’s Day https://4xcircle.com/next-step-sylvia-plath-why-its-time-to-redesign-the-london-underground-map-international-womens-day/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 11:31:59 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/next-step-sylvia-plath-why-its-time-to-redesign-the-london-underground-map-international-womens-day/ OWhen I was a baby feminist, I argued with friends that public space was political. I had been radicalized by my teenage years, sick to the teeth of street harassment from men who seemed to think the streets were theirs to roam freely, while women were relegated to decorating. It wasn’t a regular occurrence, but […]]]>

OWhen I was a baby feminist, I argued with friends that public space was political. I had been radicalized by my teenage years, sick to the teeth of street harassment from men who seemed to think the streets were theirs to roam freely, while women were relegated to decorating. It wasn’t a regular occurrence, but it happened enough times to infuriate me. On my way home from school in London, in uniform, I had been followed, had my arm torn off and I had been approached at least once by a man who displayed stalking tendencies. As I grew older, I understood these actions as displays of dominance and was disgusted. Besides my indignation, I was terribly disappointed. I had been raised in this city and I hated that this kind of behavior was an obstacle to my desire for independence and freedom as a teenager.

I had been navigating public transport alone for years by then, and it took me everywhere I wanted to go. Once I had exhausted my immediate surroundings on foot, I would take the Piccadilly line to concerts at the now bulldozed Astoria on Charing Cross Road. I would hop on the Hammersmith and City line, a portal to dancing all day at the Notting Hill Carnival. The Circle line made me feel like an intellectual in the museums of South Kensington. There was no option back then to outsource travel plans to a smart little app, so to get anywhere, like everyone else, I had to study the subway map to find out how get to my destination. If I was feeling brave, I would sometimes hop on the tube at Turnpike Lane and work as I went, staring at the mini-maps inside the carriage and leaning awkwardly into whoever sat in the seat below. I didn’t need a car. The map in my pocket unlocked my city.

Left to right: Helen Sharman (High Street Kensington), Mary Seacole (Paddington), Sylvia Plath (Swiss Cottage) and Jane Goodall (Regent’s Park). Compound: Guardian design; Alamy; Damien Dovarganes/AP

Wonder, exploration, ownership, recovery – these are all feelings I hoped to replicate when Emma Watson approached me to be part of a project reimagining Transport for London’s iconic underground map. Along with American author Rebecca Solnit, we replaced each station name with the name of a woman. A few years ago, Watson had a conversation with Solnit, who had recently completed a book with geographer Joshua Jelly-Schapiro. Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas is a book of essays highlighting stories from around the city, complete with 26 maps. One of the maps is a replica of the Metropolitan Transport Authority’s New York City subway map. Each of the MTA’s 472 subway stations has had its original name replaced with the name of a woman or a women-led collective. The names were contemporary and historic, including people in the entertainment industry, writers, artists, women’s rights agitators and a former first lady of the United States. Instead of subway stops named Penn Station, Bleecker Street, and Grand Central, there was a station named after Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable, a station named after musician Grace Jones, and a station named after the highly revered black. lesbian poet Audre Lorde.

In her conversation with Solnit, Watson had expressed her admiration for this feminist version of the New York subway map, and Solnit had immediately suggested that they create a London version.

The tube map has been reinvented many times before. Simon Patterson’s 1992 lithograph The Great Bear is the best known. In this work, metro stations are named after famous personalities, including religious figures, footballers and philosophers. A 2006 version of the hit map, published by the Guardian, attempted to illustrate the links between different British musicians and genres of music.

Rebecca Solnit and Emma Watson.
Rebecca Solnit and Emma Watson. Photography: PR

Turner Prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid’s 2011 work Moments and Connections also echoed the hit chart. A retrospective map of three key exhibitions she curated in the 1980s which brought black British and Asian female artists from the fringes to the centre, an artery-like line cuts through the middle, naming almost all the artists she she exposed. Their names are interspersed with lines of hits highlighting the creative groups, educational establishments, exhibitions and publications that played a key role in Britain’s black art movement. The map was created prior to Himid’s 2012 Thin Black Line(s) exhibition at Tate Britain. More recently, in 2017, art collective Thick/er Black Lines released a version of the map, titled We Apologize For the Delay to Your Journey, spotlighting unsung black British women and women in the art world. And in 2021, Transport for London, alongside the Black Cultural Archives, released a Black History Tube Map, highlighting the historic contributions of Black Londoners to the city. Everyone who redraws the map knows in their bones that there is power in a name.

So many different maps, signaling so much brilliant work. Yet today’s official metro map only has three stops named after women. The Seven Sisters station is named after the Hibbert sisters, who lived in the late 19th century and are known to have each planted a tree in the area. The other two stations are named after Queen Victoria (the obvious – Victoria station, but Lancaster Gate is also named after one of her royal titles).

In fact, many London Underground station names honor landowners or members of the monarchy. The average Tube traveler might not know that Leicester Square is named after Robert Sidney, the second Earl of Leicester, or that Latimer Road station is named after wealthy merchant Edward Latymer. But every man’s heritage lives in the denomination. So many statues and place names work to commemorate the power of their time, signaling that the general public should be concerned with deference to those who hoard capital or own land.

The City of Women London map centers different values. This map celebrates women and non-binary people with deep ties to the city. They are people who have accomplished extraordinary things in their field, reached new heights or served as the nucleus of social movements. We have done our best to place every woman or non-binary person at a station that is relevant to their life, whether they lived, grew up, organized or worked in the area.

From left to right: Noor Inayat Khan (Euston Square), Virginia Woolf (Warren Street), Mishal Husain (Great Portland Street) and Dina Asher-Smith (Willesden Junction).
From left to right: Noor Inayat Khan (Euston Square), Virginia Woolf (Warren Street), Mishal Husain (Great Portland Street) and Dina Asher-Smith (Willesden Junction). Compound: Guardian design; CWGC/PA; Alamy; David Vintiner/The Guardian; Pennsylvania

Some of our stations are named after wealthy people, but they don’t appear on the map simply because of what they owned. Some are British, others were born overseas. On this card are people who have expanded the possibilities of what a woman could be. Among them, Claudia Jones, the journalist, black feminist and one of the founders of the Notting Hill Carnival, and the fashion designer Vivienne Westwood, whose clothes have left an indelible mark on London with the heritage of its punk scene.

Some of our metro stations celebrate collectives rather than individuals. Their names represent historic sites of protest led by women. We placed two black feminist organizations – Awaz, the UK Asian women’s collective; and Owaad, the Organization for Women of African and Asian Descent – at Heathrow Terminals 2 and 3. In 1979, they staged a picket at Heathrow to protest the British government’s invasive virginity testing of migrant women arriving in the country.

At the other end of the map, there was no option for us for Bow Road other than the match girls. Another powerful women’s collective, operating nearly 100 years earlier in London’s East End, the 1,400 working-class women and girls working at Bryant & May’s match factory in Bow set out strike and changed the course of the British labor movement.

Our map also commemorates places of tragedy. Victoria Station is renamed in honor of transport worker Belly Mujinga, who died of complications from Covid-19 during the first UK-wide lockdown.

City of women… Reni Eddo-Lodge with the reinvented metro map.
City of women… Reni Eddo-Lodge with the reinvented metro map. Photography: Suki Dhanda/The Guardian

The now-closed Holloway Women’s Prison also takes up a spot on the map. It is a place where feminist activists have long been imprisoned for their political action, from suffragists in the early 20th century to the women of the Greenham Common peace camp in the 1980s. Feminist direct action group Sisters Uncut has occupied the reception center in 2017, writing in the Guardian that: “Prisons are an inhuman answer to the social problems faced by vulnerable women. One such vulnerable woman was Sarah Reed, a young black woman with a history of mental health issues, who in 2016 was found dead in her cell after being denied proper medical attention. Just four years earlier, she had faced an incident of shocking brutality also from the state: she was attacked by a Metropolitan Police officer who accused her of shoplifting. The officer was later convicted of common assault for the attack. By marking these tragedies, we aim to commemorate the people who have been abandoned by our society, as well as those who have defied the odds.

London has long been a place of protest, common cause, collectivism and collaboration. It is a city where decadence and extreme poverty coexist. It is a place where women from all over the world have traveled in order to unfold their true selves, often in collaboration with each other. This map may not change the world, but I hope it inspires you to take a second look at places you might once have taken for granted, to imagine the lives lived by women before you and think about the possibilities of what you could create. This map goes against any claim that the city is not for us.

City of Women London poster by Reni Eddo-Lodge, Rebecca Solnit and Emma Watson is published by Haymarket Books on March 8, 2022.


Source link

]]>
A look inside the Russian president’s inner circle https://4xcircle.com/a-look-inside-the-russian-presidents-inner-circle/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 05:27:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/a-look-inside-the-russian-presidents-inner-circle/ Vladimir Putin’s closest aides find themselves in positions of power in Russia and have the same wary view of the West It is Day 8 and Russian troops have continued their war against Ukraine, bombing a nuclear power plant even as the two sides negotiate safe corridors to evacuate citizens safely. Even as Western countries […]]]>

Vladimir Putin’s closest aides find themselves in positions of power in Russia and have the same wary view of the West

It is Day 8 and Russian troops have continued their war against Ukraine, bombing a nuclear power plant even as the two sides negotiate safe corridors to evacuate citizens safely.

Even as Western countries continue to condemn Russian Vladimir Putin, the Russian strongman refused to back down and ordered his troops to push further into Ukraine – all the way to Kiev.

Follow all live updates on the Russian-Ukrainian conflict here

In fact, on Thursday, Vladimir Putin, according to a Associated Press report, told French President Emmanuel Macron that he was determined to continue his attack “to the end”.

As the invasion continues, wreaking havoc, causing loss of life and also changing the face of Europe, let’s take a look at Putin’s inner circle and the men advising him in this offensive.

Sergei Lavrov
Minister of Foreign Affairs

Sergei Lavrov does not mince his words when he defends what he considers to be Moscow’s interests, and this style must please Russian President Vladimir Putin. PA

The 71-year-old has been part of Vladimir Putin’s inner circle for years and has served as Russia’s foreign minister for the past 18 years.

A seasoned diplomat, he is known as a cunning and tough operator and has been the face of Russia’s diplomatic efforts throughout the Ukraine crisis.

Lavrov’s tenure as foreign minister is right after that of Soviet foreign minister Andrei Gromyko, who served for 28 years. Like Gromyko, nicknamed M. Nyet {M. No}, Lavrov has become the uncompromising face of the Kremlin’s foreign policy towards the West.

the Associated Press in a report on Lavrov said: He doesn’t mince words when defending what he sees as Moscow’s interests, and that style must appeal to the tough-talking Russian president.

He expressed his anger against the West, portraying the United States as arrogant, conceited, treacherous and determined to dominate the world. He scornfully dismissed Western allies as stooges to Washington’s line to deter Russia.

Lavrov doesn’t bother to hide his irritation from the media at what he perceives to be their naïve or provocative questions, often responding with an air of contempt or outright mockery.

When a CNN In a video call from the Ukrainian capital, a reporter asked Lavrov if Moscow wanted to overthrow the Ukrainian leadership, an angry Lavrov replied: “He is discourteous. He works in Ukraine now. He is infected with rudeness.

On Thursday, he accused Western politicians of focusing on nuclear war. “I want to emphasize that it is in the heads of Western politicians that the idea of ​​nuclear war constantly swirls, and not in the heads of Russians,” he said.

“Therefore, I assure you that we will not allow any provocation to throw us off balance,” Lavrov added.

He also compared the United States to French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte and German dictator Adolf Hitler.
“In their time, Napoleon and Hitler made it their task to subjugate Europe. Now the Americans have subjugated it,” Lavrov said.

Vladimir Medinsky
Russian Presidential Assistant

All Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Now Putin’s presidential aide, Vladimir Medinsky came under fire in 2017 after being accused of plagiarism. PA

Former Russian Minister of Culture and currently Presidential Assistant to Putin, Vladimir Medinsky is the head of the Russian delegation which talks with Ukraine in Belarus.

Ahead of the second round of talks on Thursday, Medinsky reportedly told the Russian state agency RIA-Novosti“We absolutely want to reach some kind of agreement as soon as possible, even if it must be in the interests of both parties.”

Appointed Russian Minister of Culture in 2012, he was ousted in 2020 and replaced by Olga Lyubimova.

According to Free Radio Europe website, Medinsky “has helped lead the charge against art that conservative activists regard as so-called ‘gay propaganda’.”

In 2017, he came under fire after being accused of plagiarism when a Russian academic council recommended revoking his 2011 doctorate which focused on “problems of objectivity” in covering Russian history from the 15th to 17th centuries. . He was later cleared of the charge.

When asked why he was appointed to head the Russian delegation on the Ukrainian issue, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said CASSthat he possessed certain commercial qualities and that he was good at the most in-depth expert analysis.

This statement is proof of Putin’s confidence in his help and his abilities, despite his ousting from the government.

Sergei Shoigu
Defense Minister

All Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Sergei Shoigu is a close associate of Putin; they go together on widely publicized hunting and shooting expeditions in Siberia. Pictured are Vladimir Putin (R) and Albert II, Prince of Monaco (centre) with Sergei Shoigu (left). AFP

Sergei Shoigu, from the Tuva region of Russia, was appointed defense minister in 2012. It was a surprising choice, as he had no military training or combat experience.

He was credited with the military seizure of Crimea in 2014. He was also in charge of the military intelligence agency GRU, accused of two nerve agent poisonings – the deadly 2018 attack in Salisbury in the UK and the near-deadly attack on the Leader of the Opposition. Alexei Navalny in Siberia 2020.

Shoigu is a close associate of Putin; they go together on widely publicized hunting and shooting expeditions in Siberia.

He is also one of those sanctioned by the European Union since the start of the offensive. The EU said that under the “command and orders of Shoigu, Russian troops held military exercises in illegally annexed Crimea and were positioned on the border”. He is ultimately responsible for any military action against Ukraine.

Valery Gerasimov
Chief of the General Staff of the Russian Armed Forces

All Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Valery Gerasimov has played a major role in Vladimir Putin’s military campaigns since he commanded an army in the Chechnya war in 1999. AFP

Gerasimov was appointed Chief of the General Staff following the dismissal of Defense Minister Anatoliy Serdyukov on November 6, 2012.

He has played a major role in Vladimir Putin’s military campaigns since he commanded an army in the 1999 Chechen war, and he has also been at the forefront of military planning for Ukraine, overseeing military exercises in Belarus last month.

He is also credited with creating the Gerasimov Doctrine – which is a mixture of tactics developed by the Soviets, as well as military-strategic thinking about total warfare, leading to a new theory of modern warfare – a theory that looks more like to a hacking of an enemy’s company. than to attack it head-on.

In February 2013, he published a 2,000-word article, “The Value of Science Is in the Foresight”, in the Russian weekly. Kurier military-industrial in which he wrote: “The ‘rules of war’ themselves have changed. The role of non-military means in achieving political and strategic objectives has increased and in many cases they have surpassed the power of force of arms in their effectiveness. .. All this is supplemented by military means of a concealed nature.

Nikolai Patrushev
Head of the Security Council of Russia

All of Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Nikolai Patrushev served in the KGB with Vladimir Putin. AFP

Patrushev has served as Secretary of Russia’s Security Council since 2008. He is a Putin loyalist and has been with him since the 1970s in St. Petersburg.

Patrushev served in the KGB with Vladimir Putin and also headed its successor organization, the FSB, from 1999 to 2008.

He told Russian newspaper Kommersant in 2015 that “the United States would rather Russia not exist as a country at all.”

Alexander Bortnikov
Director of the Federal Security Service {FSB}

All of Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Alexander Bortnikov is one of Putin’s most loyal and trusted aides among the siloviki, or strongmen, at the top of the ministries of power. AFP

Bortnikov was the head of Russia’s all-powerful Federal Security Service (FSB) for a long time.

Reports indicate that Bortnikov is one of Putin’s most loyal and trusted aides among the siloviki, or strongmen, at the top of power ministries. He turned the FSB into the “punishing {and lethal} sword” of the Putin regime.

Sky News reports that Bortnikov is responsible for the tens of thousands of detentions and the dramatic tightening of restrictions on civil society that has accelerated over the past year.

Sergei Narichkin
Director of Foreign Intelligence Service {SVR}

All of Vladimir Putin's Men A Look at the Russian President's Inner Circle

Sergei Naryshkin met Putin during their spy training days and was deployed to Brussels as a diplomat at the same time Putin was sent as a young spy to Dresden. AFP

Naryshkin has served as director of the foreign intelligence service since 2016. Naryshkin, Russia’s foreign spy chief, has remained with the president for much of his career.

Naryshkin met Putin during their spy training days and was deployed to Brussels as a diplomat at the same time Putin was sent as a young spy to Dresden.

However, it appears that ties with Putin are currently on rocky ground.

Recently, a video emerged showing Putin lashing out at Naryshkin, telling him twice to ‘speak straight’ when discussing whether he supported the decision to recognize two Kremlin-backed breakaway regions, Donetsk and Luhansk, as as independent states, rather than as part of Ukraine. because they are internationally recognized.

With contributions from agencies

Read all Recent news, New trends, Cricket News, bollywood news,
India News and Entertainment News here. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.



Source link

]]>
Justice Department announces task force to prosecute Russian oligarchs https://4xcircle.com/justice-department-announces-task-force-to-prosecute-russian-oligarchs/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 05:21:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/justice-department-announces-task-force-to-prosecute-russian-oligarchs/ WASHINGTON — The Justice Department on Wednesday announced the creation of a task force to prosecute billionaire oligarchs who aided President Vladimir V. Putin in his invasion of Ukraine, part of a U.S. effort. United to seize and freeze the assets of those who have violated the sanctions. The task force will mobilize the resources […]]]>

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department on Wednesday announced the creation of a task force to prosecute billionaire oligarchs who aided President Vladimir V. Putin in his invasion of Ukraine, part of a U.S. effort. United to seize and freeze the assets of those who have violated the sanctions.

The task force will mobilize the resources of various federal agencies to enforce the sweeping economic measures the United States has imposed as Russia continues its unprovoked assault on Ukraine.

“We will leave no stone unturned in our efforts to investigate, arrest and prosecute those whose criminal acts enable the Russian government to continue this unjust war,” Attorney General Merrick B. Garland said in a statement.

The task force will be overseen by Lisa O. Monaco, the assistant attorney general. Andrew C. Adams, a veteran corruption prosecutor with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan, will lead day-to-day operations, according to multiple people briefed on his new role who spoke on condition of anonymity to release his name.

The task force announcement came as the Biden administration prepares another set of sanctions against more Russian oligarchs, according to a person familiar with the plans. And that followed a warning to the oligarchs from President Biden in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night, in which he said the administration was “joining European allies to find and seize their yachts, their luxury apartments, their private jets”.

It’s unclear how successful the Justice Department will be in prosecuting wealthy Russians, but the department typically establishes task forces in an effort to outline its priorities and urge prosecutors to bring cases.

“Catastrophic events, such as 9/11 or the invasion of Ukraine, often prompt the government to take stock of all of its enforcement tools to deal with a unique threat to international security,” said said David H. Laufman, a partner at Wiggin and Dana who oversaw enforcement of U.S. sanctions laws as a Justice Department official during the Obama and Trump administrations. “That’s what the Biden administration is doing here.”

The creation of the team, called Task Force KleptoCapture, adds to the series of actions that Western leaders have taken in recent days in an effort to undermine Mr Putin and the politically connected elite in Russia with alleged ties. close with him. By imposing potentially crippling sanctions on Russian financial institutions and beginning to freeze trillions of dollars in assets controlled by Moscow and oligarchs, the United States and its allies hope to push Mr. Putin out of Ukraine.

The Biden administration has sanctioned several Russian entities, including the country’s main development and military banks, one of its sovereign wealth funds and a subsidiary of state-controlled energy giant Gazprom. He sought to freeze Mr. Putin’s assets as well as those of his foreign minister, Sergei V. Lavrov, and other Russian national security officials. And he has curbed purchases of Russian sovereign bonds, barred some Russian banks from accessing Western financial markets, and cut off Russia’s access to some foreign technology products.

The European Union and Britain have taken similar punitive measures and have also banned certain military exports to Russia. But Russia went ahead with its onslaught of attacks in Ukraine.

The creation of the task force reflects the scrutiny placed on Russian oligarchs, many of whom have built their fortunes through their ties to Mr Putin. While they may not be directly involved in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, they allow Mr. Putin to help him hide his own assets and stay in power.

Russian oligarchs have invested their fortunes in assets around the world, and their ties to Mr. Putin have helped them gain influence and connections in the worlds of fine arts, real estate, Wall Street and the arts. Silicon Valley.

Some members of the Russian elite are said to be rushing to sell off their assets to protect them from seizure, presumably in anticipation of sanctions. One of the country’s most prominent oligarchs, Roman Abramovich, said on Wednesday he would sell Premier League football team Chelsea.

Other Moscow-linked oligarchs have hired US lobbyists and white-shoe law firms to try to weaken US sanctions laws like the Magnitsky Act, a 2012 measure that initially imposed sanctions on some government officials. Russian government in response to human rights abuses.

While many US law and lobbying firms have stopped representing Russian entities, not all have. For example, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, one of the nation’s largest law firms, appears to be continuing to work on 2016 election-related litigation with Alfa Bank, which the United States has placed under sanctions last week. The sanctions imposed on Alfa Bank were lighter than those imposed on some other Russian financial companies and did not require Skadden Arps to sever its ties; the law firm did not respond to requests for comment.

Alfa Bank was founded by Ukrainian-Russian oligarch Mikhail Fridman, whom the European Union separately sanctioned this week, noting that he “has been called a top Russian financier and an enabler of Putin’s inner circle.”

Mr. Adams, who will lead the day-to-day operations of the task force, has a proven track record of investigating Russian organized crime and recovering illicit assets. He joined the US Attorney’s office in Manhattan in 2013 and worked in the violent and organized crime unit before helping oversee money laundering investigations.

He has helped lead the bureau’s Money Laundering and Transnational Criminal Enterprises Unit since 2018. Under his leadership, the unit successfully prosecuted cases involving an Armenian criminal organization, corruption and money laundering scheme. money involving Brazilian public officials and a racehorse doping network, among others.

The task force will include prosecutors and investigators from the Department of Justice who have expertise in enforcing laws regarding sanctions, export controls, corruption, asset forfeiture, money laundering and taxes. And he will work with investigators from the IRS, FBI, Marshals Service, Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security and Postal Inspection Service.

The task force will target individuals and businesses attempting to evade anti-money laundering laws, hide their identities from financial institutions, and use cryptocurrencies to evade sanctions and launder money. The Department of Justice said it would use civil and criminal asset forfeiture to seize assets belonging to those subject to sanctions.

The department said its work would complement that of a transatlantic task force announced last weekend to identify and seize the assets of penalized Russian individuals and companies around the world.

The report was provided by charlie savage and Alan Rappeport of Washington, and Rebecca Davis O’Brien and William K. Rashbaum from New York.


Source link

]]>
The Pryor Center Presents “Tell Me a Story: Many Paths to Book Publishing” https://4xcircle.com/the-pryor-center-presents-tell-me-a-story-many-paths-to-book-publishing/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 06:06:10 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/the-pryor-center-presents-tell-me-a-story-many-paths-to-book-publishing/ Andrew Kilgore Masie Cochran The Pryor Center Presents lecture series presented by the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History at the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences continues Thursday, March 10 with “Tell Me a Story – Many Paths to Book Publication” featuring Masie Cochran, University of […]]]>



Andrew Kilgore

Masie Cochran

The Pryor Center Presents lecture series presented by the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History at the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences continues Thursday, March 10 with “Tell Me a Story – Many Paths to Book Publication” featuring Masie Cochran, University of Alberta alumnus and editorial director of Tin House Books.

This conference will take place at 6 p.m. via Zoom. Please register in advance with an email address associated with an active Zoom account.

Cochran’s 45-minute talk will offer a behind-the-scenes look at the world of publishing – first drafts, finding an agent, acquisitions, publishing, book covers, reviews, sales and awards. Cochran joined Tin House 11 years ago after working at Inkwell Management, a literary agency in New York. She has worked in a variety of genres: memoirs, literary fiction, narrative non-fiction, collections of short stories and essays.

Cochran has edited many award-winning and best-selling titles, including the intricately plotted novels by Claire Fuller, an Obama Book of the Year pick (Cory Taylor’s To die: a memoir), the family saga of EJ Koh The magical language of othersAnnie Hartnett is darkly funny Rabbit Cakethe detective series Vera Kelly by Rosalie Knecht, the merciless memoirs of Jeannie Vanasco (Things we didn’t talk about when I was a girl and The glass eye), the Gothic novels of Paraic O’Donnell (The House on Vesper Sands and The Swan Maker) and the acclaimed novel by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, A girl is a body of water.

The books that Cochran has edited have caught the attention of the New York Timesthe New Yorkerthe the wall street journal, Atlantic and NPR’s Fresh Air and Morning Edition. These authors have won awards such as the Aspen Words Literary Prize, Costa Novel Prize, Edgar Award, Dayton Literary Peace Prize and have been finalists for the National Book Award for nonfiction, National Book Critics Circle Award and PEN Literary Awards.

Upcoming authors include Joy Williams, Kim Fu, Sarah Krasnostein, Courtney Maum, Morgan Talty, María José Ferrada and Elizabeth Brooks.

Upcoming presentations of the Pryor Center

Thursday, April 14, 6 p.m.
The Pryor Center presents “”The Language of the State’s Will: Research Findings in the Heart of the City: Highways and Black Geographies in Urban America”” with Airic Hughes

Thursday, June 16, 6 p.m.
The Pryor Center presents “Arkansas News History: Exploring the KATV Collection” with Randy Dixon and Kyle Kellams

About the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History: The David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History is an oral history program whose mission is to document the history of Arkansas through the collection of spoken memories and visual records, to preserve the collection at life and to connect Arkansans and the world to fundraising through the Internet, television shows, educational programs and other means. The Pryor Center records audio and video interviews about Arkansas history and culture, collects recordings from other organizations, organizes those recordings into archives, and provides public access to archives, primarily through the pryorcenter website. uark.edu. The Pryor Center is the state’s only oral and visual history program with a seventy-five county statewide mission to collect, preserve and share audio and moving image recordings of the Arkansas history.

About Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences: The Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences is the largest and most academically diverse unit on campus with three schools, 16 departments, and 43 academic programs and research centers. The college provides the majority of the core curriculum for all University of Arkansas students.

About the University of Arkansas: As Arkansas’ flagship institution, the U of A offers an internationally competitive education in more than 200 academic programs. Founded in 1871, the U of A contributes more than $2.2 billion to the Arkansas economy through teaching new knowledge and skills, entrepreneurship and employment development, discovery through research and creative activity while providing training in professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation ranks the U of A among the top 3% of colleges and universities in the United States with the highest level of research activity. US News and World Report ranks the U of A among the top public universities in the nation. Learn how the U of A is working to build a better world at Arkansas Research News.


Source link

]]>
World leaders impose Kremlin sanctions over invasion – Daily News https://4xcircle.com/world-leaders-impose-kremlin-sanctions-over-invasion-daily-news/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 01:14:45 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/world-leaders-impose-kremlin-sanctions-over-invasion-daily-news/ By RAF CASERT and SAM PETREQUIN BRUSSELS (AP) – World leaders on Thursday condemned Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as “barbaric” and swiftly imposed heavy sanctions on Russia’s economy, President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle and many oligarchs from the country. “Putin chose this war, and now he and his country will suffer the consequences,” US President […]]]>

By RAF CASERT and SAM PETREQUIN

BRUSSELS (AP) – World leaders on Thursday condemned Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as “barbaric” and swiftly imposed heavy sanctions on Russia’s economy, President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle and many oligarchs from the country.

“Putin chose this war, and now he and his country will suffer the consequences,” US President Joe Biden said.

Almost in unison, the United States, the European Union of 27 and other Western allies announced a series of punitive measures against Russian banks and big companies and imposed export controls aimed at starving the country’s industries and military in semiconductors and other high-tech products. some products.

From the United States to Western Europe to Japan, South Korea and Australia, nations lined up to denounce the Kremlin as the outbreak of fighting raised fears about the shape of Europe to come. The invasion initially caused stocks to plummet and oil prices to rise for fear of rising food and fuel prices.

The West and its allies have shown no intention of sending troops to Ukraine – a non-NATO member – and risking a wider war on the continent. But NATO has reinforced its member states in Eastern Europe as a precaution against an attack on them as well.

“Make no mistake: we will defend every ally against any attack on every square inch of NATO territory,” NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg said.

Meanwhile, countries have begun taking steps to isolate Moscow in hopes of forcing it to pay such a high price that it changes course.

Biden, so far, has not imposed some of the toughest sanctions, including excluding Russia from the SWIFT payment system, which allows money transfers from one bank to another around the world. whole. Ukraine’s president has called for Russia’s expulsion from SWIFT, but the United States has expressed concern over potential damage to European economies.

Top Biden administration officials, including the secretaries of state, defense and treasury, briefed members of the US Congress in unclassified calls on Thursday.

“This is going to be a long battle that requires sustained action and unity,” Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, said after the session with senators.

The senator said there was agreement that Congress “stands ready to provide any additional resources needed” as the United States backs the Ukrainian military and backs the Ukrainian resistance. More funding may be needed from Congress.

Many lawmakers have called for the toughest possible sanctions against Russia to stop the invasion. The senator said there was recognition “we can continue to build” on those Biden has already announced.

EU leaders held an emergency summit and agreed on sanctions that cover, among others, the finance, energy and transport sectors and various Russian individuals. In a statement, the leaders said the measures will have “massive and serious consequences” for Russia.

Details won’t be available until Friday at the earliest.

“We want to cut off Russian industry from technologies that we desperately need today to build the future,” said European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said: “It’s about Russia’s leadership and being ruthless in finances and the economy.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson also announced financial restrictions and export controls. In addition, Britain will also ban Russia’s flagship airline, Aeroflot, from landing at UK airports.

Johnson called the attack on Ukraine “hideous and barbaric” and said of Putin: “Now we see him for what he is – a bloody aggressor who believes in imperial conquest.”

Canada has imposed sanctions that will target 58 individuals and entities, including members of the Russian elite and their families, the paramilitary group Wagner and major Russian banks. The punitive measures, announced after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attended a virtual meeting of G-7 industrialized nations, will also cover members of Russia’s Security Council, including top cabinet ministers.

In the days leading up to the attack, Germany suspended approval of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline from Russia.

Along with Stoltenberg and Johnson, von der Leyen called the invasion a “barbaric” attack on an independent nation that threatened “stability in Europe and the whole international peace order”.

The new US sanctions also targeted military and financial institutions in Belarus, Ukraine’s northern neighbor. Russia uses Belarus as a starting point for troop movements to Ukraine.

In addition, the UN Security Council is expected to vote on Friday on a resolution condemning Russia and demanding the immediate withdrawal of all its forces. But Moscow is certain to veto it.

Highlighting a growing rift in superpower relations, China remained alone in not condemning the attack and instead accused the United States and its allies of aggravating the crisis.

In a clear defense of Moscow, China “called on the parties to respect each other’s legitimate security concerns.”

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said ‘all parties should work for peace instead of escalating tension or exaggerating the possibility of war’ – language China always has used to criticize the West in crisis.

China went further and approved wheat imports from Russia, a move that could lessen the impact of Western sanctions. Russia, one of the biggest wheat producers, would be vulnerable if foreign markets were closed.

The possible repercussions went well beyond economics and geopolitics. The director of the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention fears the crisis could further distract global attention from helping the world’s least vaccinated continent fight COVID-19.

In New York, an artist projects “Stand With Ukraine” and the country’s flag onto a wall at the United Nations headquarters. The artist, David Forsee, says he decided to do this because he is “a concerned person who doesn’t want to be surrounded by nukes”.

___

Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the Ukraine crisis at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine


Source link

]]>
“Arcs and Circles”: Enter the Fertile Imagination of a Gardening Expert https://4xcircle.com/arcs-and-circles-enter-the-fertile-imagination-of-a-gardening-expert/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 01:20:21 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/arcs-and-circles-enter-the-fertile-imagination-of-a-gardening-expert/ Landscape artist Marc Peter Keane’s newest collection of essays, “Of Arcs and Circles,” vibrates with wisdom. His meandering ideas inspire frequent reading breaks for deeper contemplation, inducing an experience similar to walking around the “unbalanced” designs of his Japanese gardens. Arcs and Circles, by Marc Peter Keane180 pagesSTONE BRIDGE PRESS As a garden expert and […]]]>

Landscape artist Marc Peter Keane’s newest collection of essays, “Of Arcs and Circles,” vibrates with wisdom. His meandering ideas inspire frequent reading breaks for deeper contemplation, inducing an experience similar to walking around the “unbalanced” designs of his Japanese gardens.

Arcs and Circles, by Marc Peter Keane
180 pages
STONE BRIDGE PRESS

As a garden expert and writer living in Kyoto for over 20 years, Keane’s essays, like his design work, are deeply influenced by Japanese aesthetics. His words flow easily from metaphysical questioning to practical observations, with clear nods to the meandering structure of Japanese. zuhitsu personal essay form. “Of Arcs and Circles”, however, is not strictly for Japanophiles.

Even considering concepts such as wabi-sabi (imperfection) or void, Keane’s essays are based on his own experiences. His observations stem from his young adulthood in the United States, his many years in Japan as a specialist in Japanese garden design, and his home in Ithaca, New York. This mix of locations expands its ideas with a touch of relatability, even for readers unfamiliar with Japanese culture or the country.

Unlike many books detailing the “Japanese experience,” Keane does not seem concerned with imparting so-called Zen knowledge or delivering thinly veiled cultural diatribes. Instead, he plays with style and language to render a personal experience, record a moment, or divulge a thought to his readers. His book is a written version of the Japanese proverb “ichi-go ichi-e(“once, an encounter”), as each essay briefly welcomes us into the inner workings of its mind, a transient sense of connection to be cherished and reserved for future consideration.

Throughout the book, Keane deftly experiments with form. In the essay titled “Consolation for the Tumbling Mind”, Keane observes his thought process as he walks in nature. He oscillates between optimism and despair, noting that he is at first “carried away by thoughts of a life based on trust and holiness and respect for natural rhythms”, but then his mind becomes “hooked on the crusted edges of waste and callous indifference to the world we also embody. Avoiding any orderly conclusion, he leaves us with a symbol of humanity’s mark on the natural world, complicated and contradictory, as he describes approaching a polluted river. Although his original intention was to dispose of the rubbish, he discovers life among the litter – “a little fish lives in an empty tin can”. Keane is thus unable to disturb this ecosystem fragile created from our discarded waste.

Each essay is an unexpected foray into Keane’s fertile imagination. In ‘Dream Garden’ he creates dreamscapes of an apocalyptic future to affirm the importance of beauty to engender hope, and in ‘The Last God’ he challenges the innate values ​​of humanity. , postulating the idea that “mutations and accidental events” quietly triumph over our gods of power and efficiency. “What does this say about our societies, which in many ways favor those people who do everything right when in truth so much of our progress is due to the accidental and the unforeseen? he writes.

Keane provides no conclusions, but with each carefully crafted essay, he leaves his readers a little changed.

In an age of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever.
By subscribing, you can help us tell the story well.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

PHOTO GALLERY (CLICK TO ENLARGE)


Source link

]]>
Jenna Ortega gets her chills from Radiohead and ‘Paris, Texas’ https://4xcircle.com/jenna-ortega-gets-her-chills-from-radiohead-and-paris-texas/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 15:00:05 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/jenna-ortega-gets-her-chills-from-radiohead-and-paris-texas/ 2. “Paris, Texas” by Wim Wenders The first time I watched “Paris, Texas” was the first time I was moved by a movie. It’s just painful vulnerability. I haven’t seen many slow burn movies, so I didn’t expect it to be as heartbreaking as this. It can’t really be explained. You follow Travis [Harry Dean […]]]>

2. “Paris, Texas” by Wim Wenders The first time I watched “Paris, Texas” was the first time I was moved by a movie. It’s just painful vulnerability. I haven’t seen many slow burn movies, so I didn’t expect it to be as heartbreaking as this. It can’t really be explained. You follow Travis [Harry Dean Stanton], and you slowly peel off the layers. Every time I look at it, I forget where I am.

3. Avocado rolls I became a vegetarian, and whenever people asked me what my favorite dish was, I got so undecided that I couldn’t give them an answer. So I would say, “Oh, I love avocados.” And people said, “But that’s not a meal.” Well, I love sushi and I love avocado, and now it’s my favorite. You know how kids always love chicken breasts and fries? These are my chicken tenders and my fries.

4. My Sony headphones I just received them. They are noise canceling. The sound is amazing. I never need to talk to people when they’re on because they’re big and bulky. I’ve been called a “perpetual helmet head” by several people because I always have them around my neck. I couldn’t imagine walking through life all day without some sort of background music. Just feeling the weight of the headphones on my chest gives me a kind of relief.

5. “Hatred” by Mathieu Kassovitz If I ever had to make something, it would have to be similar to this. You feel like you know the characters. It breathes life. They are three boys in Paris who talk about police brutality and the struggles they go through in their time. What strikes me about this film is that it will always be relevant. It’s a bit unfortunate, but I think there’s something significant about it due to the amount of energy it has.

6. “Computer OK” from Radiohead I was shooting a movie called “X” in New Zealand, and I became really, really good friends with Jim, one of the PA [production assistants] on set, who was a huge Radiohead fan. Jim had said his favorite album was “OK Computer”, and he told me about the impact it had on him growing up. And it became pretty much the only thing I listened to. I was out of the country by myself for the very first time. I had just turned 18, so I had this newfound independence. You are slowly becoming an adult and the world is getting scarier, being so far from home and learning to do things on my own. So I think because I’m so nostalgic for that time in my life, this album will forever have immense meaning.

7. Conduct I couldn’t sleep because of the time difference between Eastern Europe and the West Coast of the United States. So I was going out every night and driving, and I realized that was probably my happiest time. I don’t talk to anyone. I am concentrated. I can roll down the window and have a snack outside. It’s a freedom I wish I could experience all the time. This is also another thing: you capture insane views. You become very observant because there is nothing else to do, especially when you really have nowhere to go.


Source link

]]>