high school – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 11:00:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://4xcircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg high school – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ 32 32 The Cercle des arts opens the student show “Spotlight on innovation” https://4xcircle.com/the-cercle-des-arts-opens-the-student-show-spotlight-on-innovation/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 11:00:19 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/the-cercle-des-arts-opens-the-student-show-spotlight-on-innovation/ CHARLEVOIX — The Cercle des arts de Charlevoix recently held an opening reception for its annual student exhibition, which features artistic works by students from the region. The Spotlight on Innovation exhibit is an annual tradition at the Cercle des arts de Charlevoix and is one that fills its gallery with artwork from high school […]]]>

CHARLEVOIX — The Cercle des arts de Charlevoix recently held an opening reception for its annual student exhibition, which features artistic works by students from the region.

The Spotlight on Innovation exhibit is an annual tradition at the Cercle des arts de Charlevoix and is one that fills its gallery with artwork from high school students and seniors envisioning a future in arts.

“Our walls are filled with the art of these students from Charlevoix and parts of County Antrim and the works we have received this year are amazing,” said Managing Director Sarah Matye.

The exhibition opened on Friday March 11 and will run until Saturday April 9, showcasing student works in all media including canvas work, painting, mixed media, digital art , sculptures and more.



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A Natural Place To Be: Full Circle Market – Winchester Sun https://4xcircle.com/a-natural-place-to-be-full-circle-market-winchester-sun/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:02:50 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/a-natural-place-to-be-full-circle-market-winchester-sun/ When you walk through the door of Full Circle Market for the first time, you are greeted by the pleasant aroma of spices, homemade dishes and natural health products. The next thing they’ll be greeted with is a friendly smile from Laura Sheehan. She has owned and operated the market, located at 1988 Bypass Rd., […]]]>

When you walk through the door of Full Circle Market for the first time, you are greeted by the pleasant aroma of spices, homemade dishes and natural health products.

The next thing they’ll be greeted with is a friendly smile from Laura Sheehan. She has owned and operated the market, located at 1988 Bypass Rd., for over 21 years.

Sheehan is from Somerset, Kentucky, and moved to the Central Commonwealth area to attend Eastern Kentucky University. After graduating from college, Sheehan spent time as a seasonal ranger for the US National Parks Service.

“I’ve worked in Yellowstone, Mammoth Cave, and the Great Smoky Mountains,” she said.

Sheehan mainly worked in the campground and helped with trail chores. During this time, she began exploring local health food stores.

“Whenever I was in a national park, I would look for local businesses and health food stores,” Sheehan said.

Eventually she felt the call to return to Kentucky, and in the late 1990s she and her husband settled in the Winchester area. Health food stores were never far from his mind.

“I felt like coming back to Kentucky that small towns needed healthy options. We need places to get things that are natural. I felt called to do this,” Sheehan said.

Based on demographic research and Winchester’s location near I-64 and Mountain Parkway, Sheehan felt the community could support a health food store.

Full Circle Market opened in 2001 in the mall behind the Winchester Kroger, and at that time it was hard to find healthy food options.

“You couldn’t find these items in the big box stores. You couldn’t find a loaf of bread at Kroger that didn’t contain high fructose corn syrup. You couldn’t find a coconut that wasn’t sweet. You couldn’t find jams and jellies that were sweetened with fruit juices instead of sugar,” Sheehan said.

It was also difficult to find a place to buy specialty items like bulk flaxseed.

The market initially had 64 bulk bins, but customers repeatedly requested smaller quantities.

“The more I learned about inventory and how fresh things were, it made more sense for us to just wrap things up and put them on the shelf,” Sheehan said.

Nor was the success of the market entirely down to luck.

“I worked hard and still work hard,” Sheehan said. “I didn’t hire anyone for four years; I think when you open a small business, you have to be realistic that it takes time.

Being realistic also means adapting to the times, especially when big retailers start offering healthier products and a global pandemic turns the script on what a typical day looks like.
“We’re dealing with things that post-pandemic and competing with other retailers that have posed challenges that we really didn’t anticipate,” Sheehan said.

At the height of the pandemic in 2020, shoppers began using curbside pickup, delivery services and going to a single store to avoid being surrounded by multiple larger crowds.

The market never closed, offered curbside service and maintained modified opening hours, but as the pandemic enters its third year, Sheehan said the challenge was to get people to return to do their purchases in person.

“Everyone’s shopping habits have changed,” she said. “I’m so grateful that everyone found everything they needed, but do you still need to order from Amazon all the time?”

Sheehan and the market employees try to make the space as welcoming as possible and provide excellent customer service.

“You can’t get that on the internet,” Sheehan said.

The market has also started selling products that are hard to find at commercial retailers, such as specialty supplements.

The marketplace offers a personalized customer service experience for people in the nascent stage of a healthier journey.

“Often customers want to talk to someone before picking them up. They have a lot of questions and have never used it before,” Sheehan said. “So we really started screening the supplements. There are many synthetic supplements… So when you walk in, you know whatever vitamin, supplement, or body care item you buy, there is nothing artificial or synthetic in it.

Sheehan said the market has also shifted to making ready-to-go meals as customer habits shifted towards this preference five years ago.

“I was asked to come and help set up the kitchen and our take-out section because I already had experience,” said the store’s kitchen manager, Katie Wallace.

Wall said she loves “working with food” and produces the market’s acclaimed chicken salad and beer cheese.

“They’re quick, easy and good,” customer Geraldine Branham said of the takeout options.

The market also offers locally sourced honey and eggs.

Sheehan said the next evolution of the market is to make it a “space where people hang out and don’t just come shopping.”

The market already has an outdoor seating area with docking stations for mobile devices.

Two art students from George Rogers Clark High School are in talks with Sheehan to paint a mural on this side of the building, and if all goes well, the market may start hosting music and dance classes. live yoga in the future.

And as times change, the need for human connection and a connection to the natural world will keep people coming back to places like Full Circle Market.


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Julia Cameron Says You Can Get Creative Indoors https://4xcircle.com/julia-cameron-says-you-can-get-creative-indoors/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 11:00:24 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/julia-cameron-says-you-can-get-creative-indoors/ I first heard of ‘The Artist’s Way’, Julia Cameron’s best-selling 1992 self-help book about tapping into your inner creativity, when I was in my twenties. years and struggling to finish a piece of writing that had nagged at me for months. A friend referred to the book, which is big and floppy as an elementary […]]]>

I first heard of ‘The Artist’s Way’, Julia Cameron’s best-selling 1992 self-help book about tapping into your inner creativity, when I was in my twenties. years and struggling to finish a piece of writing that had nagged at me for months. A friend referred to the book, which is big and floppy as an elementary school math notebook, and I went to Union Square Barnes & Noble to pick up a copy. Then I quickly put it in my bag like it was contraband. There’s something about “The Artist’s Way” that inspires eye-rolling at first – oh, then you think you’re a artist? The language of the book, with its invocations of a higher power called the Grand Creator who wants you to do things, and lines like “action contains magic, grace and power”, might sound a little quirky even for those with high woo-woo tolerance. But the advice it contains is surprisingly practical and effective. Cameron recommends two basic practices to activate his creative energy. The first is Morning Pages, a ritual of scribbling three stream-of-consciousness pages each day, preferably before you’ve even had your coffee. The second is Artist Dates, a weekly “festive and solo expedition”, like going to a museum or strolling through a strange neighborhood, to stimulate the mind through strolling. What resonates with many readers is Cameron’s pragmatic approach to getting things done and overcoming self-doubt: to get the job done, you need to have regular, daily practice. His techniques have caught on surprisingly: “The Artist’s Way” has sold over four million copies, and writers and celebrities from Elizabeth Gilbert to Alicia Keys swear by his methodology. During the pandemic, the book returned to bestseller lists.

Before being a self-help celebrity, Cameron led several other professional lives. Raised in suburban Chicago, she became a star of the New Journalism movement in the 1970s when she wrote for rolling stone and the Voice of the village on Watergate and party drugs; one writer described her as an “East Coast Eve Babitz”. She had a two-year marriage to director Martin Scorsese, from 1975 to 1977, which began after she interviewed him for a magazine article and he asked her to do some punch work on the scenario of “Taxi Driver”. The two had a daughter together, and after the marriage ended, Cameron found herself struggling to get screenplay gigs in Los Angeles. She got sober and started writing motivational essays for her friends who were always stuck in bad mental places. Over the course of a decade, these texts evolved into a popular cult workshop in SoHo and then a self-published workbook, Xeroxed. At the request of her second husband, Mark Bryan, Cameron contacted a literary agent who landed her a publishing deal. “The Artist’s Way” took off slowly at first, spreading by word of mouth, but quickly became a mainstay of “breakthrough” literature. In the years that followed, Cameron wrote several dozen other books in the same vein.

Now seventy-three, Cameron lives in a comfortable adobe house on the outskirts of Santa Fe, New Mexico. I visited him one morning in December. We sat in the purple living room of his house while his Westie terrier, Lily, circled our ankles. Cameron shares Lily’s fluffy white hair, and she had kohl rimmed her eyes. As we talked, she got up several times to bring me various artistic trinkets from her life: a pack of medicine cards from Taos, a small Casio keyboard on which she writes music, a binder full of poetry. She showed me a printout of a recent profile of her daughter, Domenica Cameron-Scorsese, now an actress and director, who cited both of her parents as equal creative influences. During the pandemic, Cameron wrote a new book just released, “Seeking Wisdom,” which urges artists to connect with their spirituality to guide their decision-making. Like most of Cameron’s methods, the latter combines concrete activity with free thought; she believes that the mind often follows the hands. Our conversation has been condensed and edited.

Did you do your morning pages today?

I was nervous about meeting you because of the pandemic. So I wrote that in my morning pages. I do them every day.

What is your ritual? Do you do them in bed? Do you do them at a desk?

I don’t do them in bed. I do ’em either over there in that chair, right over there [pointing to a large leather chair], or I do them in my library, where I have what I call my writing chair. It’s a big drunk chair. And I prepare on one side with my Morning Pages book and on the other with Lily [gesturing to the dog].

And do you ever go back and read them?

I do not. I do orientation, which is when I say, “What should I do about XAnd I’ll listen. I’m going to go back and read that again, which is sort of heartwarming and simple, and hopefully less neurotic.

What’s the last thing you asked for advice on?

How to make yourself comfortable.

What have the pages confirmed?

They said we would like each other, that we would have an immediate relationship. That we would offer you water.

Ah, so you predicted the water. When you ask for “advice” in these pages, are you asking your subconscious? Are these the answers? Or do you feel like you have another kind of distinct personality coming back to you – someone wiser, someone more confident?

I don’t mean it’s my subconscious. He feels that it is a kind of benevolent force.

Did you write a lot as a little girl? How was your childhood in terms of creativity?

My dad was in advertising. He was the executive of Dial soap. My mother was very creative. She was a poet. She was very aware of nature. She would be attentive to cardinals, robins, finches. And she had seven children. She gave us projects to do. And then she posted the result on the bulletin board in the kitchen. Things like making snowflakes, things like rhyming, drawing. I had a drawing that I still remember of a rearing palomino horse with a mountain in the distance. I read books about horses. I read “Black Beauty”. I read “The Island Stallion Races”.

I feel like a lot of girls who love horses become writers. I don’t know why it’s a correlation.

I think reading all the books about horses made me want to write. It made writing as possible as riding.

So you started writing poetry in high school?

Yes. I had a nun in high school, Sister Julia Clare Green. She encouraged me. Then when I got to Georgetown, I left as an Italian major. But it turned out that the entire Italian faculty had been hired during the summer. So there was no one who could really teach Italian. And I thought, Well, I’ll jump straight to English, then. But when I went to the English department and said, “I want to be a writer,” they said, “Men are writers. Women are wives. It was 1966. So I went to the newspaper and said, “I’d like to help,” because I had been in the newspaper in high school. And they said, “Can you make cookies?”

Oh my God.

Georgetown was therefore not in favor of a project to become a writer. They had a lot of rules. Women were not allowed to wear pants. Women were not allowed to sit on the lawn. You had to get back to the dorm before the end of curfew. No public displays of affection. When I finished college, I got a call from a boy I went to high school with. He said, “How would you like to work for the Washington To postHe was an assistant copywriter. And I said, ‘I write short stories. I don’t want to work for Washington. To post.” And he said, “Well, that’s four hours a day and sixty-seven dollars a week.” So I went there.

Is that when you started publishing in the newspaper?

Yes. A man named William McPherson offered me a job as a book reviewer. But, I had the boy I was with in high school, looking over my shoulder, telling me I was sorting the mail badly. And I told him to go to hell! And he went to the arts editor about it. The editor came up to me and said, “In Washington To post, we don’t tell people to go to hell. And so I stopped. I think that boy was jealous of me for posting pieces in the Style section. So I went back to writing short stories. And I got a phone call that said, “I’m an editor at rolling stone. I read you in the Style section. Would you like to write for us?”

Do you remember your first rolling stone mission?

Yes, it was to write about the children of E. Howard Hunt. You know, Watergate. I said, “I don’t think I want to do that.” And they said, “Well, just try.” So I found their house. I hunted. It became a cover. It was written in Time magazine. William F. Buckley [Jr.] called me and said, “You’re a disaster.”

This is where you know you’re doing something right.

And me felt that I was doing something good. And then I became known as a hot writer. And I was writing for the Voice of the village. I got my passport stamped in the right places.

Have you ever written for Squire?

No. Squire called me and wanted me to write about one-night stands, and it wasn’t my story.

And did you have a lot of contemporaries at the time, women who were also writers, that you considered your peers?

I was friends with a writer you may know, Judy Bachrach. And Judy was kind of doing everything right, and I was on the outside. I never had the security of a full-time job. It’s always true. I write my books on specifications.

wow. Always? Not on offer?

Yes. I write the whole book, then I try to sell it.

You were part of the new journalism crowd. So you have Nora Ephron, you have Joan Didion, you have Tom Wolfe, you have all these people who write. Did you go to parties?


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The man who changes the way we think about the Internet https://4xcircle.com/the-man-who-changes-the-way-we-think-about-the-internet/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 00:04:18 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/the-man-who-changes-the-way-we-think-about-the-internet/ As it turns out, Suzu spends her time as a popstar in the parallel world of “U”, a virtual reality that promises a fresh start and a fresh start, something extremely promising for a teenage girl who feels bad about herself. As an Internet Bell popstar (to be clear, spelled without an “e” as in […]]]>

As it turns out, Suzu spends her time as a popstar in the parallel world of “U”, a virtual reality that promises a fresh start and a fresh start, something extremely promising for a teenage girl who feels bad about herself. As an Internet Bell popstar (to be clear, spelled without an “e” as in the title, as Suzu’s name translates to “Bell” in English), she finds immediate viral fame, something that quickly brings her to life. contact with another famous – or rather, infamous – inhabitant of U: “The Beast”, with whom Suzu feels a mysterious kinship.

In some ways, Belle could be seen as a riff on our growing desire to occupy fully visualized virtual social spaces – as seen for example, with games like Fortnite and Animal Crossing: New Horizons acting as concert zones. or interviews, and allowing people the opportunity to mingle during lockdown. But it’s also much more fundamentally about the whole nature of online communication and how it can facilitate both personal transformation and self-reflection.

“I think the fact that there is this other world where we can be another version of ourselves [helps to show] that we are not just what we show to society, “Hosoda told BBC Culture.” Belle and Suzu are so different they’re virtually different people, but in fact, they’re the same person. Sometimes we end up believing that we are only one side of ourselves, but in reality we have many dimensions. And to learn that and believe that it helps us to be freer. “

Hosoda’s fantasies of digital life

Hosoda’s directorial career began around the turn of the millennium, and as his filmography developed, parenthood and the lives of children clearly became his favorite themes. His previous film, Mirai from 2018, explores a father who becomes a stay-at-home parent for the first time. Prior to that, Wolf Children in 2015 and The Boy and the Beast in 2012 both saw single parents fearful of where their children’s independence will take them, as well as the influence they have in the shape of their lives. But alongside this focus on the family, a more specific interest that he repeatedly explored was the role the internet plays in the development of children today – something he tackled. for the first time in his very first feature film, 2000’s Digimon: The Film and returned in Summer Wars in 2009, about a high school student getting involved in an online world called Oz, and now Belle.

Indeed, this motif of children seeking advice and refuge in fantastic digital realms is perhaps the most striking element of his work – even in his films which do not explicitly deal with the internet like Mirai, where the tree The genealogy of the young protagonist is presented as a sort of traversable web space. His films often visually reflect the influence of digital culture by having one foot in and one foot out of reality – for example, while his characters may be designed with a sober and natural look, they very often act with overreacting. and caricatures. Thematically, the socialite typically collides with the afterlife as its young or adolescent protagonists navigate their rapidly changing lives doing something physically impossible – time traveling in The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and Mirai, being taken to another dimension in The Boy and the Beast, and stepping into virtual reality in Summer Wars and Belle.


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City of Toledo | The MLK 2022 experience to honor the leader of civil rights … https://4xcircle.com/city-of-toledo-the-mlk-2022-experience-to-honor-the-leader-of-civil-rights/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:53:02 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/city-of-toledo-the-mlk-2022-experience-to-honor-the-leader-of-civil-rights/ The city of Toledo and the University of Toledo are proud to recognize civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. at the 21st annual celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Unity Day. This year the museum Art of Toledo, Alpha Phi Alpha and the Human Relations Commission of the City of Toledo will join […]]]>

The city of Toledo and the University of Toledo are proud to recognize civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. at the 21st annual celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Unity Day. This year the museum Art of Toledo, Alpha Phi Alpha and the Human Relations Commission of the City of Toledo will join the festivities to create the MLK Experience, which will be filled with events to honor MLK’s dedication to the non-violent struggle for racial equality in the United States.

On January 12, 2022 at 10:00 a.m., Mayor Kapszukiewicz, Dr. Gregory Postel, President of the University of Toledo, Erin Baker, President of the Human Relations Commission, and Malaika Bell, Interim Executive Director, Office of Diversity and inclusion, participate in a virtual press conference.

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android:https://toledo-oh-gov.zoom.us/j/83581611122

Or Phone:
Dial:
United States 602,333 2017
US 8882045987 (US toll free)
Conference code: 132366

Find local AT&T numbers: https://www.teleconference.att.com/servlet/glbAccess?process=1&accessNumber=8882045987&accessCode=132366

The city of Toledo will have a livestream here: https://www.facebook.com/cityoftoledo

Alpha Xi Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. will kick off the event by hosting the MLK Scholarship Breakfast on January 15 at The Pinnacle, located at 1772 Indianwood Circle at 8:30 a.m. Jermain Pettis, Head of Community Development and SVP Loans for the Georgia Banking Company, will be the guest speaker.

On January 17, 2022, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Unity Day celebration will be held virtually from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on toledo.oh.gov/MLK and will feature keynote speaker Andre Gaines, renowned producer, director and director. Financial. He will be joined by the speakers, Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz and Dr Gregory Postel, President of the University of Toledo. The virtual event also includes performances by the MADD Poets Society, the Scott High School Choir and the Toledo Opera.

MLK’s legacy of community engagement will be reflected in the 40-day service of the Northwest Ohio Human Relations Commission and Multi-Faith Council from Jan.15 to Feb.28. Residents are encouraged to call Centraide at 2-1-1, volunteer with one of the 2-1-1 referral organizations, and share your experience by completing a survey reflecting your service.

In addition to the virtual event on January 17, the Toledo Museum of Art will host a special day of in-person activities during special museum hours from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., including screenings of The One and Only Dick Gregory who was produced by Andre Gaines, and a recorded presentation of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s I Have a Dream speech The Family Center will feature crafts for youth and glassblowing demonstrations will be held in the Glass Pavilion.

Masks are required for in-person events.

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Confusing your art – MARIST CIRCLE https://4xcircle.com/confusing-your-art-marist-circle/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 22:02:50 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/confusing-your-art-marist-circle/ Surreal and strong are the words expressed by many who have seen Lindsey Centracchio’s last 23 play, “Green in the Summer, Home” in the lobby of the Steel Plant Studio. The piece, premiered in fall 2021, brings together a mix of distinct color tones and delicate brushstrokes to create a synchronization of eye-catching artistic expression. […]]]>

Surreal and strong are the words expressed by many who have seen Lindsey Centracchio’s last 23 play, “Green in the Summer, Home” in the lobby of the Steel Plant Studio. The piece, premiered in fall 2021, brings together a mix of distinct color tones and delicate brushstrokes to create a synchronization of eye-catching artistic expression. It is clear that Centracchio is not a fan of the art world.

“It’s like I’m creating my own puzzle in a certain way and as I go, I connect more puzzle pieces until I know it’s finished,” Centracchio explained when asked him about his artistic process. “But I don’t know what those pieces of the puzzle will be until I do… you kind of keep going and as you go it makes more sense.”

Much like his artistic process, Centracchio’s artistic career has been filled with different types of puzzles. Through art as a medium, Centracchio was able to use the most formative moments of his life and express them through pieces that not only contain strong thematic nuances, but help him understand himself and others in class. of road.

It all started with a high school mural. “I noticed that in my school there were a lot of murals, but there are [was] not much diversity in the paintings. “said Centracchio. She wanted to use her art as a way to bring the community together.” So I painted a lacrosse player and then for my other I painted my friend who is Moroccan and I painted her in playing football and therefore there is a representation of the players [of color]. “From that moment on, Centracchio realized the impact his work could really have.

Centracchio then decided to go further. Her goal was to create a play that made her high school classmates really think about themselves and think about what was important to them. “I painted the whole hallway and made [these] cool abstract circles all over the hallway. I had one main centerpiece and it was […] a very ambiguous figure, ”Centracchio explained. Underneath the coin were the words “Love is…”. What does this mean to me? ‘”

Instead of painting an entire hallway or a mural, she sought to use her art as a medium of communication, through pure visualization rather than words told on the walls of her high school hallway.

In 2017 and 2018, Centracchio undertook a medical mission to Haiti. While there, she spent much of her time with the children who resided in the orphanage where she stayed. “Every day we were going to spend time with the kids and just bond with these kids,” Centracchio said. “I was not able to speak personally to all of them. Some of them could talk a little [of English], but most of them were kids or toddlers, so they can’t even speak anyway. “Centracchio wanted to capture the ways in which she was able to communicate with the children of Haiti through their facial expressions. So, she set out to photograph the children and the people with whom she was able to create a lasting relationship to remember who. they were and the time they spent together.

Centracchio took his own photographs and made a concentration of 12 pieces. She approached the project organically, seeking to portray the true expressions of each child.

“Every portrait that I did was someone who made an impact on me. So to be able to paint them and show their true beauty and be able to show the world how I see them. […] is really cool, “Centracchio said.” I think it’s really inspiring to see portraits and just think introspectively about yourself and those around you. “

Centracchio’s evolving passion for portraits led her to create one of his favorite pieces to date. One of his largest plays, “Distance”, features two women in a bath while wearing sunglasses. “I [wanted] focus on composition, depth of color and skin and appreciation in our objective way, ”she said, with the aim of testing her skills using a plethora of concepts and techniques. With a soft yet vibrant baby blue color throughout the piece, in contrast to the skin tones of the women, Centracchio is able to highlight the true meaning behind it.


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Ronald D. Carabbia, Struthers, Ohio https://4xcircle.com/ronald-d-carabbia-struthers-ohio/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 21:53:03 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/ronald-d-carabbia-struthers-ohio/ STRUTHERS, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Ronald D. Carabbia, 92, passed away with his family by his side on Wednesday afternoon, December 22, 2021, at Mercy Health-St. Elizabeth Health Center in Boardman. Mr. Carabbia was born April 8, 1929 in Youngstown, Ohio, the son of Tony and Mary Carbone Carabbia. A graduate of Struthers High School, Ron, […]]]>

STRUTHERS, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Ronald D. Carabbia, 92, passed away with his family by his side on Wednesday afternoon, December 22, 2021, at Mercy Health-St. Elizabeth Health Center in Boardman.

Mr. Carabbia was born April 8, 1929 in Youngstown, Ohio, the son of Tony and Mary Carbone Carabbia.

A graduate of Struthers High School, Ron, a proud United States Marine Corps veteran, enlisted at the end of World War II and served in the Pacific region and participated in the occupation of China.

Ron was honorably released in 1948 and returned to the area and worked at Youngstown Sheet & Tube for a short time.

He met the love of his life, Josephine Constantino and six months later they were married on November 26, 1960. They decided to raise their family in the Struthers-Poland area and built their house on Knollwood Ave .

Entrepreneur, Ron was the founding owner of Crown Vending in Struthers. In addition to Crown Vending, Ron has had many business ventures over the years. He always enjoyed the challenge of organizing and running new businesses and, until his death, continued to pursue the art of closing a business.

Ron’s many pleasures included spending time in his home in Lakewood Ranch, Florida, biking, running eight to ten miles a day, great wine, great food, and celebrating the Christmas season.

Her family was the center of her life and her circle of friends were her best friends. Two friends who played a very special role are Vito, who was like Ron and Pete’s second son, who was there for him every day for the past ten years.

Ron will be remembered for his humility and generosity; quietly helping those in need and his love for his family and friends.

Ron leaves his 61-year-old wife, JoJo at home; daughter, Sheryl Carabbia of Boardman; son, Ronald Carabbia of Lakewood Ranch, Florida; seven grandchildren, Alicia and Anthony (Melissa Burke) Horvath, Ronald and Rionna Carabbia, Tiffany (Dr Joseph) Barak, Courtney (Dr Tom) Hagele and Alexa (Dustin) Baker; four great-grandchildren, Helena, James and Corina Hagele and Joseph Barak; sister-in-law, Sally Ann Almasy from Poland and wonderful and beloved nieces and nephews.

Besides his parents, Ron was predeceased by his sister, Jean Celec and his brother, Charles Carabbia.

Friends will be received on Monday, December 27, 2021 from 10:00 am to 10:45 am at Christ Our Savior Parish at St. Nicholas Church in Struthers.

A Christian funeral mass will follow at 11:00 am, with Father Matthew Humerickhouse officiating. A mask is compulsory in the church.

The private family burial will follow at Lake Park Cemetery in Youngstown.

Arrangements are made by Cunningham-Becker Funeral Home in Poland.

Ron’s family would like to express their sincere gratitude to Dr Patsy Buccino and the staff, Dr Joe Barak and Dr Joshua Gady, for the exceptional care they have provided to Ron.

In lieu of flowers, the family would like monetary contributions sent to the funeral home or family to be scattered to the St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church accordingly.

To send flowers to Ronald’s family, please visit our flower shop.

A TV Tribute will air on Monday, December 27 at the following approximate times: 6:43 a.m. on WYTV, 9:32 a.m. on WKBN, 10:58 a.m. on FOX and 8:12 p.m. on MyYTV.


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For Ken Ruble, what circulates, comes back https://4xcircle.com/for-ken-ruble-what-circulates-comes-back/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 18:29:53 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/for-ken-ruble-what-circulates-comes-back/ LAS CRUCES – His youth in his father’s garage inspired Ken Ruble’s interest in mechanical things. This interest led him to his passion for racing and ultimately to a degree in mechanical engineering. Ruble, now the Operations Director of the Advanced Innovation Workshop at NMSU’s Aggie College of Engineering, has conveyed this inspiration to a […]]]>

LAS CRUCES – His youth in his father’s garage inspired Ken Ruble’s interest in mechanical things. This interest led him to his passion for racing and ultimately to a degree in mechanical engineering. Ruble, now the Operations Director of the Advanced Innovation Workshop at NMSU’s Aggie College of Engineering, has conveyed this inspiration to a multitude of students over the past 12 years.

Ruble competed in motocross races when he graduated from high school, switched to drag racing, and then to circular track racing. He started with a kit car and then started building chassis of his own design. Several years later, marriage and family took priority. He sold his race cars, bought tractors and a property in Chaparral, New Mexico, where he built a house and a store.


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Friendship Circle seniors swing around the Christmas tree – Delco Times https://4xcircle.com/friendship-circle-seniors-swing-around-the-christmas-tree-delco-times/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 10:17:12 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/friendship-circle-seniors-swing-around-the-christmas-tree-delco-times/ BOROUGH OF DARBY – The Friendship Circle Senior Center held its annual holiday party last week. Over 70 members from across the community attended the festivities, so they could share great food, fun and laughter. Christine Helmandollar, director of Friendship Circle, said. “As the holiday season approaches, it is important for seniors isolated during the […]]]>

BOROUGH OF DARBY – The Friendship Circle Senior Center held its annual holiday party last week. Over 70 members from across the community attended the festivities, so they could share great food, fun and laughter.

Christine Helmandollar, director of Friendship Circle, said. “As the holiday season approaches, it is important for seniors isolated during the pandemic to come together and engage with friends and family. Here at Friendship Circle Senior Center, we’re celebrating by throwing a pretty special party.

Throughout the pandemic, the Friendship Circle Senior Center has promoted the independent safety and well-being of their elders by providing take-out meals, home meals on wheels, and opening their doors and enforcing distancing social. Friendship Circle is located in the parking lot of the Trinity-Mercy Catholic Campus on Lansdowne Avenue, Darby. For more information on Friendship Circle, call 610-237-6222 or visit https://scsdelco.org/centers/friendship.shtml.

Media-Providence Friends School announces 2022-2023 preschool program for 2-year-olds

Media-Providence Friends School announces the expansion of its preschool program, open to 2-year-olds for the 2022-2023 school year. This first class of two-year-old preschoolers will join the school’s 3- and 4-year-old preschool classes for a Quaker values-based friends education in the heart of downtown Media.

From Grades 2 to 8, MPFS awakens the passion and potential of all individuals within a welcoming and diverse community driven by Quaker values. From the age of two, research shows that the younger school years are the most crucial in developing a student’s positive attitude toward learning. Starting with the two-year program and continuing into the junior and senior high school classes, MPFS states that it strives to develop the independence, resilience, confidence and curiosity that distinguish graduates and make them want to learn. In a safe and nurturing learning environment, MPFS preschool and specialist teachers arouse children’s natural curiosity, helping them build self-confidence as they explore the world and find the pleasure of learning.

The MPFS Preschool Program is a three-year sequential program starting at age two that encompasses social, emotional, physical and cognitive development. Over the course of a school day, balanced between free play and learning through carefully structured multi-sensory lessons, the child-centered curriculum provides a solid foundation for basic skills in literacy, math, science, social science, art, physical education, Spanish and music.

Potential families are invited to register for the next MPFS Live Virtual Open House at mpfs.org/rsvp. To learn more, visit http://mpfs.org or contact Angela DiMaria, vice-principal of the school, at 610-565-1960, ext 104.

Media Mayor named “Global Statesman of the Year 2021”

Media Borough Mayor Bob McMahon was recently honored by the US Global Leadership Coalition as 2021 Global Statesman of the Year for 2021. McMahon was recognized for his advocacy work for global leadership United States as an effective approach to strengthening local communities in our country.

The mayor currently sits on the advisory committee of the UGLSC in Pennsylvania. The USGLC paid tribute to mayors across America during its virtual 2021 tribute celebration on December 7.

Former US Senator Norm Coleman, co-chair of USGLC, and Michael Bloomberg, former New York City mayor and head of Bloomberg Philanthropies, joined USGLC’s Tribute to America’s Mayors, which highlighted McMahon among a bipartisan group of mayors from across the country honored for their leadership.
McMahon, a Democrat, has served the Borough of Media since 1982 and has been Mayor of Media since 1992. His partnership with the US Global Leadership Coalition began after serving in the Vietnam War where he was tasked with negotiating diplomacy and peace. public security. in three Vietnamese villages. McMahon saw the value of diplomacy and development among the sometimes divergent Vietnamese people in the communities where he was stationed.

“The USGLC is a group that supports diplomacy internationally,” said McMahon. “They advocate for diplomacy and development among different and often disparate groups to prevent conflict and keep our nation safe. “

The US Global Leadership Coalition is working in the nation’s capital and across the country to strengthen America’s civilian tools – development and diplomacy – alongside defense. By advocating for a strong international affairs budget, the USGLC strives to make U.S. international affairs programs a keystone of U.S. foreign policy. The USGLC is a large influential network of 500 companies and NGOs; national security and foreign policy experts; and business, faith-based, academic and community leaders in all 50 states who support a power-smart approach of elevating development and diplomacy alongside defense to build a better and more secure world.

The Prospect Park Fourth of July association plans a bingo

Prospect Park Fourth of July will host Designer Bag Bingo, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday, January 29, at Prospect Park Masonic Lodge, 822 Lincoln Ave., Prospect Park. For information on how to get tickets for the fundraiser, visit the “Prospect Park Fourth of July Association” Facebook page or email prospectpark4july@gmail.com.

Property Tax and Rent Reimbursement Program Deadline Approaches

Seniors and people with disabilities have until Friday, December 31 to claim rebates on property taxes and rents paid in 2020. The Departments of Revenue and Aging remind Pennsylvanians that rebates are available through the Rebate Program. property / rent tax, which benefits qualifying Pennsylvanians aged 65 and over; widows and widowers aged 50 and over; and people with disabilities aged 18 and over.

Eligible applicants are encouraged to visit http://mypath.pa.gov to electronically file their expense claims. This is the best way to ensure that an application is filed by the deadline later this month.
Submission and application through myPATH is easy and does not require the person to create an account. Online filing gives instant confirmation that the application has been successfully filed. For those who wish to file on paper, they can download an application from http://www.revenue.pa.gov.

The income limit is $ 35,000 per year for homeowners and $ 15,000 per year for renters, and half of Social Security income is excluded. The maximum standard discount is $ 650, but additional discounts for some qualifying owners may bring the discounts up to $ 975. The Department of Revenue automatically calculates additional discounts for eligible homeowners.

The Property Tax / Rent Reimbursement Program is one of five programs supported by the Pennsylvania Lottery. Since the program’s inception in 1971, seniors and people with disabilities have received more than $ 7.1 billion in property tax and rent relief. The rebate program also receives funding from slot machine games.

Norwood Church Offers New Year’s Checkup for Relationships

The Emmanuel Lutheran Church and the Council for Relationships have worked together to provide local residents and their partners with a gift of healing and growth that lasts a lifetime and will make life more enjoyable. Using the tools provided by the program, each participant and his partner will experience a relationship assessment, a chance to reconnect on several subjects.

Sloan Previdi, LMSW, and Reverend Scott Lee will offer the three-day retreat, divided into three separate sessions of approximately one and a half hours for three consecutive Sundays on January 9, 16 and 23. Immanuel Lutheran is at 501 Chester Brochet, Norwood.

To register or get more information, call the church office at 610-586-5860 or email Pastor Lee at pastor.immanuel@verizon.net or Sloan Previdi at sprevidi@councilforrelationships.org.

Readers can email community news and photos to Peg DeGrassa at pdegrassa@21st-centurymedia.com.


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Column: turn up the volume! How Cathryn Beeks and Listen Local are boosting San Diego’s music scene https://4xcircle.com/column-turn-up-the-volume-how-cathryn-beeks-and-listen-local-are-boosting-san-diegos-music-scene/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 13:00:15 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/column-turn-up-the-volume-how-cathryn-beeks-and-listen-local-are-boosting-san-diegos-music-scene/ Cathryn Beeks no longer lives here. Not physically anyway. But while the founder of the Listen Local radio show and Musician Resource Center now resides in the Lucerne Valley, San Bernardino County, her music-loving heart still belongs to San Diego. Since starting hosting open mic parties at the Coaster Saloon in Mission Beach 19 years […]]]>

Cathryn Beeks no longer lives here. Not physically anyway. But while the founder of the Listen Local radio show and Musician Resource Center now resides in the Lucerne Valley, San Bernardino County, her music-loving heart still belongs to San Diego.

Since starting hosting open mic parties at the Coaster Saloon in Mission Beach 19 years ago, Beeks has been one of the biggest fans of the San Diego music scene. And as his plans expanded to include an online events calendar, festivals, club nights, and a radio show, building became his business.

If you’re a San Diego musician who wants to be heard, Beeks wants it to happen. Because she knows what it’s like when it doesn’t.

“When I first came to San Diego, I had big dreams of being a famous rock and roll singer. But when I was trying to get into open mics in 1999, it wasn’t very open. If they didn’t know you, you couldn’t have a showcase, ”said Beeks, who moved to San Diego from Cleveland after years of working in the real estate industry and touring and recording with several bands.

“I wanted to create an open mic party where even people who had just arrived in town could find a show and play, where it was open and you could just step in the door. It was a joy for me to find a good group and to give them a hand.

On Monday, Beeks will host a holiday version of Listen Local’s free virtual song circle, a now-monthly pandemic project that gives musicians of all stripes the chance to sing along and socialize. Since it is the holidays, the songs will be festive. Since it’s Listen Local, so will the mind.

“Cathryn is just amazing at bringing people together,” said local singer, songwriter and producer Jeff Berkley. “She sees opportunities everywhere and she knows how to put the right people together to make the magic happen.”

Born in Riverside, Beeks grew up in a home where everyone from Janis Joplin to ABBA and the Eagles took a ride on the well-used family turntable. Beeks finally started making music when she attended Lancaster High School. It was mid to late ’80s, and when Beeks joined a neighbor’s band, she embarked on a decades-long journey that took her to perform with bands in Jacksonville, Florida. , Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and Cleveland; write songs and open a thrift store in Lakewood, Ohio; and the street in Boulder, Colorado.

By the time she arrived in San Diego in 1999, Beeks had acquired a very useful set of survival skills. She knew how to reconcile office work and musician life. She knew that being creative also meant being flexible. And when she started expanding her open mic parties to something bigger, she also knew that when you want to change your life, having a goal helps.

“Everything I do stems from my fear of going back to a 9 to 5 job,” Beeks said with a laugh. “You try to figure out what people need, and then you try to provide that service. “

Over the next 10 years, that meant turning ListenLocalsd.com into a website with a daily schedule of live performances by local artists and a growing list of open mic showcases in clubs across the county. This meant launching the Band Camp Music Festival at Mission Beach. During this time, Beeks was performing with several local bands, including the Gandhi Method and Not Your Mom.

And in 2009, she took over as the host of “The Homegrown Hour,” a long-running San Diego music show that landed on the alternative adult station KPRI / 102.1 FM. At the end of that concert in 2014, the enterprising Beeks presented her show on the web with ListenLocalRadio.com. Twelve years later, his monthly Listen Local Radio show still gives any musician in San Diego, Big Bear or the High Desert who emails him a song a chance.

“She’s created opportunities for so many artists by opening venues for them and playing them on the radio,” said Berkley, who worked with Beeks when she recorded “The Homegrown Hour” in her studio. “She has brought up so many artists to be seen on stage.”

From the Lucerne Valley home she shares with her husband, Jon Edwards, Beeks rotates many artistic plates. There’s Hart Acres, an outdoor event space, and a mini campground where she hosts artist retreats and photo and video shoots. She still plays with her band Calamity, runs the thrift store @greenroomshop on the Poshmark online marketplace and makes videos about artists and musicians for her YouTube channel 1/2 Fast.

But no matter where she is or what she’s doing, Cathryn Beeks keeps her eyes and ears on San Diego. There is no place like a musical house.

“The people in power in San Diego’s music industry are affordable and accessible, and they really want to help the people who created this community,” Beeks said. “San Diego is very unique in this regard. The music scene is very friendly and cooperative. There is a lot of love in being such a big city.

Listen Local’s virtual song circle and holiday party take place Monday, December 20 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Go to listenlocalradio.com for more information.


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