full circle – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:02:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://4xcircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg full circle – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ 32 32 A Natural Place To Be: Full Circle Market – Winchester Sun https://4xcircle.com/a-natural-place-to-be-full-circle-market-winchester-sun/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:02:50 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/a-natural-place-to-be-full-circle-market-winchester-sun/ When you walk through the door of Full Circle Market for the first time, you are greeted by the pleasant aroma of spices, homemade dishes and natural health products. The next thing they’ll be greeted with is a friendly smile from Laura Sheehan. She has owned and operated the market, located at 1988 Bypass Rd., […]]]>

When you walk through the door of Full Circle Market for the first time, you are greeted by the pleasant aroma of spices, homemade dishes and natural health products.

The next thing they’ll be greeted with is a friendly smile from Laura Sheehan. She has owned and operated the market, located at 1988 Bypass Rd., for over 21 years.

Sheehan is from Somerset, Kentucky, and moved to the Central Commonwealth area to attend Eastern Kentucky University. After graduating from college, Sheehan spent time as a seasonal ranger for the US National Parks Service.

“I’ve worked in Yellowstone, Mammoth Cave, and the Great Smoky Mountains,” she said.

Sheehan mainly worked in the campground and helped with trail chores. During this time, she began exploring local health food stores.

“Whenever I was in a national park, I would look for local businesses and health food stores,” Sheehan said.

Eventually she felt the call to return to Kentucky, and in the late 1990s she and her husband settled in the Winchester area. Health food stores were never far from his mind.

“I felt like coming back to Kentucky that small towns needed healthy options. We need places to get things that are natural. I felt called to do this,” Sheehan said.

Based on demographic research and Winchester’s location near I-64 and Mountain Parkway, Sheehan felt the community could support a health food store.

Full Circle Market opened in 2001 in the mall behind the Winchester Kroger, and at that time it was hard to find healthy food options.

“You couldn’t find these items in the big box stores. You couldn’t find a loaf of bread at Kroger that didn’t contain high fructose corn syrup. You couldn’t find a coconut that wasn’t sweet. You couldn’t find jams and jellies that were sweetened with fruit juices instead of sugar,” Sheehan said.

It was also difficult to find a place to buy specialty items like bulk flaxseed.

The market initially had 64 bulk bins, but customers repeatedly requested smaller quantities.

“The more I learned about inventory and how fresh things were, it made more sense for us to just wrap things up and put them on the shelf,” Sheehan said.

Nor was the success of the market entirely down to luck.

“I worked hard and still work hard,” Sheehan said. “I didn’t hire anyone for four years; I think when you open a small business, you have to be realistic that it takes time.

Being realistic also means adapting to the times, especially when big retailers start offering healthier products and a global pandemic turns the script on what a typical day looks like.
“We’re dealing with things that post-pandemic and competing with other retailers that have posed challenges that we really didn’t anticipate,” Sheehan said.

At the height of the pandemic in 2020, shoppers began using curbside pickup, delivery services and going to a single store to avoid being surrounded by multiple larger crowds.

The market never closed, offered curbside service and maintained modified opening hours, but as the pandemic enters its third year, Sheehan said the challenge was to get people to return to do their purchases in person.

“Everyone’s shopping habits have changed,” she said. “I’m so grateful that everyone found everything they needed, but do you still need to order from Amazon all the time?”

Sheehan and the market employees try to make the space as welcoming as possible and provide excellent customer service.

“You can’t get that on the internet,” Sheehan said.

The market has also started selling products that are hard to find at commercial retailers, such as specialty supplements.

The marketplace offers a personalized customer service experience for people in the nascent stage of a healthier journey.

“Often customers want to talk to someone before picking them up. They have a lot of questions and have never used it before,” Sheehan said. “So we really started screening the supplements. There are many synthetic supplements… So when you walk in, you know whatever vitamin, supplement, or body care item you buy, there is nothing artificial or synthetic in it.

Sheehan said the market has also shifted to making ready-to-go meals as customer habits shifted towards this preference five years ago.

“I was asked to come and help set up the kitchen and our take-out section because I already had experience,” said the store’s kitchen manager, Katie Wallace.

Wall said she loves “working with food” and produces the market’s acclaimed chicken salad and beer cheese.

“They’re quick, easy and good,” customer Geraldine Branham said of the takeout options.

The market also offers locally sourced honey and eggs.

Sheehan said the next evolution of the market is to make it a “space where people hang out and don’t just come shopping.”

The market already has an outdoor seating area with docking stations for mobile devices.

Two art students from George Rogers Clark High School are in talks with Sheehan to paint a mural on this side of the building, and if all goes well, the market may start hosting music and dance classes. live yoga in the future.

And as times change, the need for human connection and a connection to the natural world will keep people coming back to places like Full Circle Market.


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Actor brings movie to Prince George, coming full circle https://4xcircle.com/actor-brings-movie-to-prince-george-coming-full-circle/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 20:25:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/actor-brings-movie-to-prince-george-coming-full-circle/ Film star, Laura Mitchell, returns to Prince George to shoot a film she wrote and will direct, to give back to the community that has given her so much. The star of last year’s The Great North Christmas was so impressed with Prince George’s enthusiasm for the film that she thought she would return here […]]]>

Film star, Laura Mitchell, returns to Prince George to shoot a film she wrote and will direct, to give back to the community that has given her so much.

The star of last year’s The Great North Christmas was so impressed with Prince George’s enthusiasm for the film that she thought she would return here to shoot her own film this year.

Meeting Mr. Christmas is the first film Laura Mitchell has written and she will take her place behind the camera as director during filming from February 6-19.

Prince George takes on his own life in the film with his own thread woven into the tapestry of the story, Mitchell said.

“People from Prince George were so open to helping and sharing and being a part of something and it was really touching because coming from Vancouver people are a bit above the film industry there and they don’t find it as exciting as they do. I did it once when I got to Prince George and just seeing the excitement was really a very beautiful thing, to be quite honest, and it was so lovely because even though the people didn’t know it and were new, they were so eager to learn and they understood it right away and for me it was really lovely.

As soon as the opportunity presented itself to Mitchell to write a film and direct it, she decided to return to the place that had welcomed her so warmly last winter, she added.

“In this film, Meeting Mr. Christmas, the community of Prince George is actually a character in its own right, it’s like a thread that runs through the film because it’s the community that holds the whole film together and it’s so important – so what better place to do that than

the community that is so important to the people of Prince George? Mitchell said. “So that’s what really inspired me and to come back and see all the faces that we worked with last year is really lovely. And we got to cast a few people from Prince George and that’s really exciting too. It is a wonderful experience to come full circle.

Writing a movie was just something Mitchell knew she could do because she always wrote synopses of ideas she saw in her creative mind’s eye.

Sitting down to put it all together was a bit daunting, but having worked in the film industry for a long time helped her understand the structure of a film.

“So my boyfriend, who’s a cinematographer, and I kind of sat down together and had this idea and I just hammered it and it just flowed,” Mitchell explained the collaboration with Ryan Petey, who will be the director of photography on Meeting Monsieur Noël.

All casting is complete, but there is still a need for more staff on set to volunteer in the arts and props department.

“So if someone is good at decorating for Christmas, we always need more people to do it,” Mitchell said. “It’s going to be really fun and we’ll make sure it’s a great experience for everyone.”

Previous locations include The Makerie Craft & Coffee Bar and The Twisted Cork Restaurant, both located in downtown Prince George.

To volunteer for a behind-the-scenes adventure, email mrchristmas@gmail.com.


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Eric Vacheresse closes the loop with ‘Gate Keeper’ https://4xcircle.com/eric-vacheresse-closes-the-loop-with-gate-keeper/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:37:21 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/eric-vacheresse-closes-the-loop-with-gate-keeper/ When earlier this week Eric Vacheresse showed me around “Gate Keeper,” his new exhibit opening in the Vanderelli Room, he could literally have been walking in his grandfather’s footsteps, given that his grandfather father grew up in a McDowell Street housing estate that once existed where the Franklinton Gallery now exists. “It’s a bit surreal. […]]]>

When earlier this week Eric Vacheresse showed me around “Gate Keeper,” his new exhibit opening in the Vanderelli Room, he could literally have been walking in his grandfather’s footsteps, given that his grandfather father grew up in a McDowell Street housing estate that once existed where the Franklinton Gallery now exists.

“It’s a bit surreal. It’s almost like I’ve come full circle,” said Vacheresse, a Franklinton resident like her grandfather and great-grandfather, who once lived in the apartment above what is now Rehab Tavern. “I have always felt a connection with this region, with my grandfather and seeing old photos of him. But I didn’t know he grew up on McDowell until I moved to 129 [Studios]. It felt like it was meant to be. And having one of my first solo shows here at Vanderelli Hall, right next to the land he grew up on, is one of those cool things. It brings me closer to my family. »


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The circle has come full circle – Santa Clarita Magazine https://4xcircle.com/the-circle-has-come-full-circle-santa-clarita-magazine/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:54:38 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/the-circle-has-come-full-circle-santa-clarita-magazine/ A door that was believed to be closed opened. During a recent visit to my homeland, Israel, a reunion with my primary school friends was called. These are my childhood friends whom I met over fifty-five years ago, when we ourselves were the most authentic. Long before we had learned to play the roles of […]]]>

A door that was believed to be closed opened. During a recent visit to my homeland, Israel, a reunion with my primary school friends was called. These are my childhood friends whom I met over fifty-five years ago, when we ourselves were the most authentic. Long before we had learned to play the roles of adults, sophisticated and pretentious. They were innocent days of sharing joy, laughter and tears, much like growing up with our own brothers and sisters. I remember playing hide and seek games with no hidden intention. Reuniting with these old friends, I could still see their eyes sparkling with dreams and hope for a bright future.
In anticipation of our reunion, we didn’t know what to expect. We approached cautiously, not even knowing what each other’s faces looked like. Have we changed a lot? The years have taken their toll. Our faces got older and our bodies moved a little slower, but our smiles and eyes remained the same. We began to share our life stories in turn from our formative years. Deep scars opened in all of us from this intimate reunion of five girlfriends sharing a meal, family style.
We learned that the girl with the most captivating smile and who appeared to be a carefree girl lived under the most painful childhood circumstances, grew up with a mother who faced the trauma of the Holocaust. Another girl, who seemed to have everything from smart clothes, plenty of shoes, and piano lessons, felt unworthy and uncomfortable being brought up in a life of privilege. Each wrinkle had a story. The shy, calm boy who became an internationally renowned architect building the world’s most famous bridges, couldn’t bridge the gap in his personal life with his wife and children. We have mentioned friends who have divorced, moved across the world, and had successful careers. We remembered those who never returned from military service, including the nice boy I shared my first kiss with. A girl who was the most liberal and free-spirited had found God and is now raising many children in a traditional Orthodox home. The prettiest guy in school who had all the girls wrapped around his finger couldn’t find the strength to seek outside help and committed suicide.
We received the latest updates on who did what, why and where. We felt their sorrow, their pain and their joy. We joked about our physical aging issues and compared our sore bones, but we always felt lucky to be together. We felt good in our circle of friendship which had been renewed. We had come full circle. Our camaraderie was true to the essence with unconditional love, like the good old days. It was a real connection that was unaffected by the weather. We have promised to keep in touch and make new happy memories together from now on.
Naomi Young has been a Jewish studies teacher and bar / bat mitzvah teacher in Santa Clarita for 39 years. She is also a published writer and an artist. Contact her at naomi-young7@yahoo.com Visit her art website at www.naomiyoung.com


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A “homecoming” loop | News https://4xcircle.com/a-homecoming-loop-news/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 23:29:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/a-homecoming-loop-news/ ENID, Oklahoma. – A buffalo surrounded by a herd of scissor-tailed flycatchers practically emerged from the canvas on display in the lobby of NBC Oklahoma’s Enid branch. The towering 84 x 60-inch oil on canvas titled “Homecoming,” painted by acclaimed artist John Newsom, was unveiled during the 17th edition of NBC’s Oklahoma Artist Series. Newsom […]]]>

ENID, Oklahoma. – A buffalo surrounded by a herd of scissor-tailed flycatchers practically emerged from the canvas on display in the lobby of NBC Oklahoma’s Enid branch.

The towering 84 x 60-inch oil on canvas titled “Homecoming,” painted by acclaimed artist John Newsom, was unveiled during the 17th edition of NBC’s Oklahoma Artist Series.

Newsom returned to his native Enid to celebrate his commissioned piece on Tuesday, December 28 that the bank hosted a celebration for his new work of art.

NBC Chairman Ken Ferguson kicked off the Bank’s annual Artist Series.

“We wanted something to give to our customers as holiday gifts, so if we were ordering a piece of art. We could hand out signed and numbered posters, postcards and prints, ”Ferguson said.

People came to NBC’s Altus, Enid, Kingfisher, and Oklahoma City locations just to see the art.

“John grew up across the street from me when I lived in Enid,” Ferguson said. “I knew him when I was little. For him, painting ‘Homecoming’ is amazing. It’s great for him to come home to show this new play and see his parents and teachers.

“Return to the homeland”

The “Homecoming” painting was based on many symbols of Oklahoma.

Born in Kansas and raised in Enid, Newsom uses pieces of Oklahoma’s flora and fauna to form the basis of many of his works.

A painting created in the vertical landscape of his current New York home, juxtaposed against the horizontal landscapes of Oklahoma, really came full circle in Newsom’s return to Enid.

“No matter how well known the work becomes, you are always outside of it because what you are disseminating to the world is the painting is the work of art, it is not the me”, Newsom said. “It is not about the physical self behind it, but about the work of art. It’s nice to be able to interact with an audience, when in reality, it’s the paintings that make the whole interface.

Newsom’s works, including “Homecoming,” will be at the Oklahoma Contemporary Museum for a retrospective titled “Nature’s Course” in March. The museum exhibit features 31 paintings from the past 20 years.

The Oklahoma Contemporary exhibition will run from March 24 to August 15, 2022.






John Newson signs a print for his painting “Homecoming” at NBC Bank on Tuesday, December 28, 2021. Newsom was in town to exhibit his art as part of the NBC Oklahoma Artist Series. (Billy Hefton / Enid News & Eagle)




“It’s a big deal,” Newsom said. “I’m working on the brother / sister painting of this ‘Homecoming’ painting. This is the title piece of the exhibition. He has a herd of buffaloes. (“Homecoming”) is the singular buffalo. I really read it as an allegorical self-portrait.

“The artist is the symbol of the return to the homeland. I painted this painting in New York and having it here at Enid is just amazing.

Newsom said that when Ferguson asked him to appear on the NBC Oklahoma Artist series, he was immediately drawn to the plan he was given.

A few of Newsom’s former teachers came to the reception on Tuesday to greet him.

“Ms. Dowma came by. She was my English teacher at Emerson and it was fantastic to see her,” he said. “One of my class assignments was to read ‘The Outsiders. ‘ Through the journey and the experience of life I was introduced to Matt Dillon, now he and I are very good friends. He was in the movie ‘The Outsiders’. He will participate in the programming of Oklahoma Contemporary.

To see his teacher befriending the actor in a movie based on a book that meant so much to Newsom in his youth, really touched him, he said.

Newsom has participated in exhibitions all over the world. The experienced artist has collections in dozens of famous galleries and museums. On January 22, Newsom will begin its Beijing debut.

“This is my debut in Enid. This is definitely a first and very, very close to the heart, ”he said. “I painted the ‘Homecoming’ picture with this in mind. Being here to share it made the trip very rewarding. Growing up here in my youth, I dreamed of going out and exploring the world as a painter. Now I’m back here to share it as a mature artist.


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Schenectady’s photographer to move into new studio space – The Daily Gazette https://4xcircle.com/schenectadys-photographer-to-move-into-new-studio-space-the-daily-gazette/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 22:41:52 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/schenectadys-photographer-to-move-into-new-studio-space-the-daily-gazette/ SCHENECTADY – Kristen Bordonaro had one modest goal when she opened a small photo studio in her living room 11 years ago: to earn enough money to cover the monthly car payment. Today, Bordonaro’s studio, Sophia Sabella Photography, is the sole source of income for the single mother of three, who moves to a 1,200 […]]]>

SCHENECTADY – Kristen Bordonaro had one modest goal when she opened a small photo studio in her living room 11 years ago: to earn enough money to cover the monthly car payment.

Today, Bordonaro’s studio, Sophia Sabella Photography, is the sole source of income for the single mother of three, who moves to a 1,200 square foot studio at 1740 Union Street on December 29. This move will mark the third time Bordonaro has moved the business since opening, with each space increasing in size.

“I kind of picked it up off the side and it just exploded,” she said.

Originally from California, Bordonaro moved to the Schenectady area with her then-husband 14 years ago. She left behind a career as a kindergarten and first grade teacher and focused on educating her children for a few years after the move.

She started taking portraits of her friends for free on weekends, but as the word spread, Bordonaro, who had no previous business experience, saw an opportunity to earn some money. extra money and got a business license.

She managed to do the rest along the way, often using Google and YouTube to develop her business knowledge, while also completing several mentoring programs that allowed her to coach portrait photographers to hone her photography skills.

Other than that, Bordonaro had no formal photography training, relying instead on what she described as her natural ability to spot a good photo and a deep passion for art. Her images include everything from family portraits to “cake chips,” which capture smiling toddlers doing damage by diving into their first birthday cake.

In recent years, Bordonaro has started taking real estate photos in parallel, but she said her specialty is babies and children, which she attributes to her time in class.

“I love children and I really feel that my time in education with kindergartens has really translated to me,” she said.

What started as a side business quickly turned into a full-time business for Bordonaro after her divorce six years ago, when she needed a way to provide income for her family, which included the flexibility of looking after her three children now aged 12, 14 and 15.

So, she stepped up the business, moving from the living room to a 250 square foot studio near Patrick’s Union Street Barber Shop in Schenectady. A few years later it moved again, this time to its current 750 square foot location on Baker Avenue.

Bordonaro’s new space – which she has described as “come full circle” – is just yards from her first storefront on Union Street and is almost double the size of her current studio. The new space will include a commercial aspect, where Bordonaro plans to sell canvas prints and several configurations that will provide more than 300 customers a year with greater options during photo shoots.

“I kind of had to figure it out,” she said. “My passion for photography and the need to be home with my kids – I just realized it. “

Prices at Sophia Sabella Photography – named after Bordonaro’s two daughters – vary by service, but a 30-minute shoot, which includes five digital images, costs $ 275. A 60-minute session costs $ 325 and includes eight images.

The end result is worth it, according to Emily AuClaire, a Bordonaro customer for eight years.

AuClaire described Bordonaro’s work as “amazing,” adding that she has a way to connect with two children here, Keegan and Kennedy.

“She somehow relates to children and makes them smile and listen,” she said. “Coming in now, my kids are just going to sit and smile for her.”

AuClaire said she referred a lot to Bordonaro’s studio, adding that every time she walks into the studio she meets someone she knows.

“She goes out of her way to work with clients,” said AuClaire. “I recommend her to everyone. “

Bordonaro, meanwhile, has his eyes set on growth here.

The business has grown each year, which she credits to a growing network of client support, but Bordonaro said she would eventually like to hire an additional photographer.

“It’s just me, but I hope they will be more,” she said. “This is my goal in the next five [years] is getting so big that I will need some help.

Contact reporter Chad Arnold at: 518-410-5117 or [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter: @ChadGArnold.

More from The Daily Gazette:

Categories: News, Schenectady County


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All aTwitter: December 23, 2021 https://4xcircle.com/all-atwitter-december-23-2021/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/all-atwitter-december-23-2021/ The objective of Everything on Twitter is to give readers a convenient place to check out Washington football team beat writers and bloggers, national sports journalists and football fans to stay on top of the latest news and opinions on the WFT, the NFL and the sport in general, as well as a handful of […]]]>

The objective of Everything on Twitter is to give readers a convenient place to check out Washington football team beat writers and bloggers, national sports journalists and football fans to stay on top of the latest news and opinions on the WFT, the NFL and the sport in general, as well as a handful of other things.







Hogs Haven Social Media Information

The Facebook page: Click here to like our page

Facebook store: Washington Football Shirts

Twitter: Follow @HogsHaven

Instagram: Follow @Hogs_Haven

Manager: Scott Jennings: Follow @ScottJenningsHH

Invoice in Bangkok: @ billhorgan2005




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Check Out These 5 New Openings That Are Making Birmingham Better, Including Full Circle Birmingham https://4xcircle.com/check-out-these-5-new-openings-that-are-making-birmingham-better-including-full-circle-birmingham/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 23:11:50 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/check-out-these-5-new-openings-that-are-making-birmingham-better-including-full-circle-birmingham/ Dreaming of their new space. Photo via Full Circle Birmingham Looking for a little more holiday cheer? You’ve come to the right place, because we are because we’re preparing five of Birmingham’s new openings to get us excited. Let’s grab a cup of coffee and go in. 1. Hand and stone | Hills of Vestavia […]]]>
Dreaming of their new space. Photo via Full Circle Birmingham

Looking for a little more holiday cheer? You’ve come to the right place, because we are because we’re preparing five of Birmingham’s new openings to get us excited. Let’s grab a cup of coffee and go in.

1. Hand and stone | Hills of Vestavia

new openings
Need a little R&R? Check out Hand and Stone this week. Photo via Hand and Stone Vestavia Hills

Ready to relax in the New Year? Hand and Stone is Birmingham’s newest massage and facial spa that offers more than once a year. Owner Caroline Goldasich is active in the community and wants Hand and Stone to be a part of the community in a way your typical spa won’t.

Caroline has always been interested in the health and wellness community, but has never pursued it professionally until now. She loves all hand and stone treatments, but her favorite is deep tissue massage. Since they just opened, they’ve been running special early bird deals – just $ 69.95 for a 1-hour Swedish massage OR a classic 1-hour facial.

Stay tuned for a big opening celebration in early 2022.

“It’s something that interests me. I love to exercise, I love skin care, I always try new things and do new things and have always been like this for as long as I can remember. This is one of the reasons Hand and Stone is so exciting to me. It’s something that interests me personally and that translates into a professional aspect.

-Caroline Goldasich, Owner, Hand and Stone Vestavia Hills

2. Full tour of Birmingham

Full circle.  New openings.
Goodies from Full Circle Birmingham, can’t wait to shop. Photo via Full Circle Birmingham

Full Circle Birmingham is far from a new concept for The Friendship Circle of Alabama, but their new showcase deserves all the recognition. Now located just off Linden Ave, this upscale resale store was originally housed in the Levite JCC, but has decided to spread its wings into a more permanent home.

The best part about Full Circle Birmingham? They provide vocational training to people with intellectual disabilities and teach them the practical skills of the job. Come to Homewood not only to mark cute and lasting threads, but also to make a difference in the lives of others. While online shopping is not yet available, you can purchase their Poshmark store here.

Full Circle Birmingham wouldn’t be complete without their donations or volunteers. If you have any lightly used rooms that could use a new home, please consider donating to Full Circle Birmingham. Donation forms and volunteer information are available on their website.

3. Local roots | Birmingham

new openings
Local Roots has so many options… and they all come to Birmingham. Photo via local roots

This Tuscaloosa favorite has officially made it north of Birmingham. Local Roots, a fast, casual restaurant based in Alabama, believes in the power of great food that brings people together. The inspiration behind their business? Owner Dustin Spruill’s grandfather, Harold. In the same way he took care of his garden, Spruill wants to continue to share his passions and his food with an audience in Alabama.

They have a pretty impressive lineup with Chef Brandon Wiman, a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. He has worked with award-winning chefs James Beard Chris Hastings of the Hot and Hot Fish Club and Brian Somershield of El Barrio and Paramount.

This new location will be a must. I know we are already looking forward to the Buttermilk Fried Chicken Fillets. Yum!

4. Frido Kahlo Modern Mexican Cuisine

new openings
Dishes as pretty as Kahlo’s art. Photo via Frida Kahlo Modern Mexican Cuisine’s Facebook

Pelham, get ready for your new Mexican restaurant: Frida Kahlo Modern Mexican Cuisine. Inspired by famous Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, this modern Mexican restaurant focuses on a sophisticated touch of classic dishes. Count us on Jamaica Tacos, please! No Mexican mood? They even have the basics on their menu, including “La Torturada,” a beef and pork burger.

“VIVA LA VIDA” or “Long Live” in English is written all over their website and communications, in addition to being connected to artist Frida Kahlo. I think that’s a nice description of not just their food, but the vibe of this Birmingham opening as a whole. We can’t wait to try it out soon.

5. Juniper

new openings
The former Little Savannah space will be a magnificent gin bar. Photo by Lauren Bedford for Bham Now

A gin bar in Forest Park? Sign us up. You might remember a few months ago when we wrote about this place taking over Little Savannah, but the time has finally come for Juniper to open its doors.

While the grand opening is yet to be determined due to their liquor license, this new location is sure to be a vacation hit for the next couple of weeks. Rumor has it that these drinks are perfect, as is the space. We can’t wait to see him bring the Forest Park community together.

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Nick Raischel completes loop with Red Creek Bar and Grill in Painesville Township – News-Herald https://4xcircle.com/nick-raischel-completes-loop-with-red-creek-bar-and-grill-in-painesville-township-news-herald/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 22:17:12 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/nick-raischel-completes-loop-with-red-creek-bar-and-grill-in-painesville-township-news-herald/ When Nick Raischel teamed up with longtime restaurateur Anthony Zappitelli to open Red Creek Bar and Grill in Painesville Township in 2016, in many ways it came full circle for him. “I actually worked for Anthony 20 years ago at Red Hawk in Concord,” Raischel said. “I used to serve at the bar, cook and […]]]>

When Nick Raischel teamed up with longtime restaurateur Anthony Zappitelli to open Red Creek Bar and Grill in Painesville Township in 2016, in many ways it came full circle for him.

“I actually worked for Anthony 20 years ago at Red Hawk in Concord,” Raischel said. “I used to serve at the bar, cook and serve. I did almost everything there.

“I have always been in restaurants since I was a child. I was 15 when I first started doing the dishes and slowly worked my way up the ranks for a few years.

Nick Raischel poses in the main dining room at Red Creek Bar and Grill. (Sean Fitzgerald – The News-Herald)

After that, Raischel decided he wanted to go out on his own and continue working in the restaurant business full time, moving south to start his own path.

“I went to the Art Institute of Atlanta culinary school,” he said. “I opened restaurants there in Florida and California.”

He was still drawn to northeastern Ohio, so Raischel decided to return home.

“There is no place like home, and I ended up coming back here,” he said. “I grew up in Chardon, which is not very far. I also met a girl in Atlanta and was able to convince her to move to Ohio with me. We moved here and I ran a restaurant chain for a while where we had six units.

Raischel says he’s always been someone looking for his own opportunity, and someone introduced him to what happened with Zappitelli in Painesville Township. The two got together and finally made things happen and created Red Creek, which will mark its sixth year in April.

The bar set up at the Red Creek Bar and Grill, with rows of liquor bottles lining the wall. (Sean Fitzgerald – The News-Herald)

Food at Red Creek is more of a comfort food style, with meal portions so large that customers often have more to take home.

Land signage for Red Creek Bar and Grill. (Sean Fitzgerald – The News-Herald)

“We make sure our customers are well fed, and there will always be more food in the house with the huge portions we are handing out,” Raischel said with a laugh. “You won’t go hungry here and you will get a second meal out of it. “

When the pandemic initially shut down many local businesses in 2020, Red Creek was ready to place take out orders via online delivery. But when things picked up, the customers came back.

“We were stable and were fortunate to have some take out experience,” said Raischel. “We’re in a big part of the community and people keep coming back, with regulars stopping by several times a week. They kept calling and we kept taking their take out orders. When people were able to come back to the building, they came back and we didn’t seem to lose too much. We are very lucky for our guests, the people who take care of us.

“We are busy now,” he added. “We have a 100-person room in our basement that we use and that we haven’t been able to use in recent years. We had a few parties here which certainly helped the business with December and January seeing a bunch of Christmas parties.

It is not lost on Raischel that working for and with Anthony Zappitelli has given him a starting point to begin his career. It is a kindness that he has not forgotten.

“It’s a unique situation to have worked with Anthony for so many years,” said Raischel. “He’s a great human being and takes great care of everyone I know, takes care of me. We both have a passion for this industry and providing food, and just experience with guests. I am very lucky to have him as a partner.


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Queens native Keechant Sewell comes to head NYPD https://4xcircle.com/queens-native-keechant-sewell-comes-to-head-nypd/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:46:17 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/queens-native-keechant-sewell-comes-to-head-nypd/ It was just an exercise, but the scenario was painfully familiar: A white cop had just killed an unarmed black man, and now the candidates to become New York’s next Police Commissioner had to show how they would address them. media. Some went straight into the technical details of what happened, Mayor-elect Eric Adams said. […]]]>

It was just an exercise, but the scenario was painfully familiar: A white cop had just killed an unarmed black man, and now the candidates to become New York’s next Police Commissioner had to show how they would address them. media.

Some went straight into the technical details of what happened, Mayor-elect Eric Adams said. But one candidate began by acknowledging the loss of the victim’s life.

“It made me sit down because she understood there was a tragedy because a life had been lost,” Mr. Adams said. “This is what we need to understand.”

The mock press conference was a test in a multi-month selection process, but Adams had found his candidate. On Wednesday, he introduced Keechant Sewell, the 49-year-old Detective Chief of the Nassau County Police Department on Long Island, as the first woman to lead the New York Police Department and its 35,000 uniformed officers.

The appointment comes amid an attempt to remake the police from the inside after last year’s protests against police brutality and systemic racism. Mr Adams, who vowed during the campaign to choose a woman to lead the department in which he served for 22 years, said the way Chief Sewell handled the hypothetical situation demonstrated what he called “intelligence emotional “that made her stand out.

“These are the scenarios that we are going to be faced with,” he said. “I hope we don’t have a shootout like this, but if we do, I need the Police Commissioner to stand in front of the room and let New Yorkers know that everything will be fine, because it’s not just substantial, it’s perception, isn’t it? “

Wednesday’s announcement to Community Capacity Development, an anti-violence organization in Long Island City, the Queens neighborhood where Chief Sewell was born, reflected what Mr. Adams said is a cultural shift for his administration, which will seek to work more with community organizations to give the public a greater role in helping police reduce crime.

“In this town and right now, I’ve come full circle,” said Chief Sewell. “The NYPD has an important role to play in making our communities safer, but we can’t do it alone. “

Chief Sewell takes the helm of the police force at a time of deep uncertainty.

“There has never been a time in my 51 years in this profession that has been as problematic as this,” said Bill Bratton, who has served as police commissioner twice, most recently in 2014. to 2016. “You have the toughest policeman role in the country, bar none.

Chief Sewell is expected to play a crucial role in establishing the balance Mr. Adams wishes to achieve between community-led security strategies and traditional policing practices, including some controversial ones Mr. Adams plans to revive, such as plainclothes police units to target guns. But it was unclear what role she would play in running the department from the start: She faces a steep learning curve with just two weeks to go.

He also accused her of diversifying a department that has made progress but still struggles to reflect the city’s population. Although the number of Asian and Hispanic officers increased during Blasio’s administration, the force is only around 15% black, while the city’s population is around 25% black. Women officers make up about 18 percent of the force.

Chief Sewell, who is due to retire as an officer and relocate from Long Island to New York to take on the civilian post of commissioner, served 22 years in the Nassau County Department, rising through the ranks in a variety of missions , including narcotics and internal affairs. She was the first black woman appointed Chief Detective, overseeing a division of around 350 people.

She was highly regarded by her colleagues and seen as a tough but fair boss of the detective office, said John Wighaus, president of the Nassau County Detectives Association. In October, her members voted her Law Enforcement Person of the Year.

“She sets an example and values ​​the men and women in our service very much,” said Mr. Wighaus.

The department saw his potential early on, sending him in the fall of 2008 to the FBI’s National Academy, a prestigious and competitive training program for law enforcement officials. She was an outstanding student, her counselor and classmates said, and she was elected class president and gave the opening speech.

“I found her to be absolutely remarkable,” said Valerie Tanguay-Masner, who attended the academy when she was a member of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Office, a position she has since retired from.

“Keechant was very athletic, very energetic, very focused and driven by what she wanted to do,” she added. “I believe his integrity is absolutely flawless. She was a shining star.

Art Howell, a classmate who retired earlier this year as a police chief in Racine, Wisconsin, said that as a black woman and sergeant at the time, Chief Sewell was a rare figure in the academy. Most of the other officers held higher ranks, and only 26 of the 256 participants were women, he said.

But he said the symbolism shouldn’t overshadow his qualifications. “She’s got a lot of substance,” he said.

Huge challenges await him in New York City, where relations between police and communities of color have been strained for years and calls to downsize policing predate the pandemic.

Perhaps his biggest challenge will be overcoming doubts about his ability to lead a much larger and bureaucratically more complex department than the force of about 2,400 Nassau County officers. As the chief detective there, she has as many people under her command as the typical city precinct commander.

She inherits a strained relationship with the city council and state legislature, which her predecessors criticized for enacting laws to make the criminal justice system fairer, but which former commissioners called scapegoats. , emboldened criminals and made the city less safe. Gun violence, which peaked for a decade in 2020, remains higher than before the pandemic.

On Wednesday, Chief Sewell looked unfazed. At the press conference, she said those who doubted her should “come talk to me in a year.”

Dr Tracie Keesee, who served as a Denver police officer for 25 years and deputy police commissioner in New York, said the challenges facing the next police commissioner also present opportunities to reshape the culture and operations of the department.

The city has already started experimenting with asking social workers to respond to some mental health calls that have traditionally been made to the police and have opened a neighborhood safety office to give communities more say in how they are protected. Dr Keesee, co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity, a nonprofit public policy organization, said it was also possible to eliminate inefficiencies from internal processes.

Frederick Brewington, a civil rights lawyer who has called for police reform in Nassau County, said he believed that as Police Commissioner Chief Sewell would be able to showcase forces that ‘she hadn’t been able to post to Long Island.

Had Chief Sewell been in charge of the department, he said, he expected the county to have seen greater progress.

“There would have been an opportunity to see meaningful reforms if she had been a police commissioner in Nassau County,” he said.

Others have described her as someone who impressed them with her self-confidence, sharp intellect, and listening and problem-solving skills.

“There was no loophole in the armor,” said Jeffrey Knotts, a retired FBI special agent who served as his FBI academy adviser.

Paul Tonna, who first met Chief Sewell as part of a two-year leadership program he helps lead at Molloy College on Long Island, said she had previously led a police protest for participants alongside the decorated SWAT team and officers from the K-9 unit – a group Mr. Tonna noted were largely older white men.

“All these guys with all these stars on their backhand, and Keechant absolutely commanded all of their respect,” he said. “She is the real deal and an incredible force of nature.”

One of the participants, Tracey Edwards, a member of Long Island Advocates for Police Accountability, said she had sought to implement reforms within the Nassau County Police Department, but found the department reluctant to adopt. change. “But she had no place in that resistance,” Ms Edwards said of Chief Sewell. “That tells me everything.”

Chief Sewell’s love for the city and her varied law enforcement experience will be a strength as she takes on her new role, Ms. Tanguay-Masner said.

“I think everything that has happened in Keechant’s career so far has prepared her for this challenge,” she said.

Emma G. Fitzsimmons contributed reports. Kitty Bennett and Jack Begg contributed to the research.


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