Circle art – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 10:58:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://4xcircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Circle art – 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ 32 32 Peterborough Players presents CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION next month https://4xcircle.com/peterborough-players-presents-circle-mirror-transformation-next-month/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 10:16:05 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/peterborough-players-presents-circle-mirror-transformation-next-month/ The 2022 Summer Player Season continues with Circle Mirror Transformation. This beautiful, fun and instant comedy-drama from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker explores the catalyst for intimate self-discovery in the most humorous setting. Artistic director Tom Frey directs the piece. Circle Mirror Transformation opens Thursday July 7th and lasts until Sunday July 17th. When an […]]]>

The 2022 Summer Player Season continues with Circle Mirror Transformation. This beautiful, fun and instant comedy-drama from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker explores the catalyst for intimate self-discovery in the most humorous setting. Artistic director Tom Frey directs the piece. Circle Mirror Transformation opens Thursday July 7th and lasts until Sunday July 17th.

When an unlikely company of strangers come together to take a community theater class in a small Vermont town, they discover more about themselves than Stanislavski, Hagen or Meisner. As they hilariously participate in acting drills that are sure to teach them something (right?), they discover that the real study lies in their own growth, exploration, and discovery. While open, surrounded by the trappings of the studio, the powerful class exercises inspire both teacher and students to face their lives with greater courage.

“To me, it’s a quintessential Players show; unexpected, and one that makes you laugh as much as it moves you,” Frey says. “In my experience, drama class was where I laughed and sometimes cried the hardest with my classmates because someone made a brilliant choice or self-revelation. However, as the action of this play takes place in a theater classroom, anyone, whether they’ve set foot in the studio or not, will relate to these incredibly well-written characters.”

The cast includes a mix of returning Players company members, as well as some new faces. Kate Kenney (Our Town at the Players, A Christmas Carol National Tour) returns as Theresa; Philip Kershaw (Our Town at the Players, Julius Caesar at the Houston Shakespeare Festival) returns as Schultz; Douglas Rees (Arsenic and Old Lace at the Players, Our Town at Alabama Shakespeare Festival) returns as James; and Katie Shults (Beehive: The 60s Musical at the Players, Pride and Prejudice at Lost Nation Theatre) returns as Lauren. Additionally, the Players welcome Marina Re (Master Class at the Coachella Valley Repertory Theatre) as acting teacher, Marty.

Scenic design is by Emmy Boisvert, costume design is by Bethany Mullins, lighting design is by Jonathan (Jack) Stoffel, sound design is by Kevin Frazier, and prop design is by Emily Allinson. Julia Perez and Vanessa C. Hart are Actors’ Equity Stage Management.

Special events

In addition to our previously announced Post-Show Talkback on July 10, Players are hosting our next Food Truck Night on July 16! Join us between 5-7pm when Total Thai Food Truck will be on hand with amazing Thai food, available for purchase. Come early on the 16th and enjoy! Additionally, Pay-What-You-Can tickets for Circle Mirror Transformation will be available Friday, July 8 for anyone who needs help accessing tickets for player productions. We invite patrons to attend this performance, with a guest, for whatever they feel they can afford. Tickets must be reserved in advance through the box office: (603) 924-7585.

Single tickets to Circle Mirror Transformation are $47 and are on sale NOW. Flexible barn door passes available throughout the summer season. Tickets can be purchased at www.peterboroughplayers.org or by calling the box office at (603) 924-7585.

Peterborough Players is New Hampshire’s first professional regional theater. The Players is known for an annual summer season, this year with 5 mainline productions and 1 children’s show, and continues to offer the Arts on Screen series which includes screenings of renowned performances from The Met: Live in HD. The Players enriches the human experience by producing quality professional live theater, developing and training theater artists, and providing New Hampshire with a wide variety of performing arts events. Peterborough Players is sponsored in part by the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information, please visit Peterborough Players, 55 Hadley Road, Peterborough, NH 03458 or www.peterboroughplayers.org


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10 Sights to See on a New York Circle Line Cruise https://4xcircle.com/10-sights-to-see-on-a-new-york-circle-line-cruise/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/10-sights-to-see-on-a-new-york-circle-line-cruise/ —This article is sponsored by Get Your Guide. If you make a purchase by clicking on one of the links, we may earn affiliate fees. 10Best however operates independently, and this does not influence our coverage. A Circle Line cruise is the perfect perch to soak up New York’s famous sights and magnificent skyline. The […]]]>

—This article is sponsored by Get Your Guide. If you make a purchase by clicking on one of the links, we may earn affiliate fees. 10Best however operates independently, and this does not influence our coverage.

A Circle Line cruise is the perfect perch to soak up New York’s famous sights and magnificent skyline.

The modern fleet is designed to provide passengers with an unbeatable water-level sightseeing experience from its large windows and exterior decks.

You won’t waste time waiting in long lines and you won’t pay expensive admission fees. Iconic landmarks of the Big Apple will float as you cruise along the East and Hudson Rivers, with plenty of photo opportunities that will be the envy of Instagram. Expert tour guides narrate throughout, sharing insight, entertaining information, and insider tips.

The interior seats are temperature controlled for comfortable nautical travel in any weather. If your appetite whets, a range of sweet and savory food and beverages, including beer, wine and cocktails, are available for purchase from the onboard cafe.

Whether you’re a tourist visiting for the first time or a local looking to savor the city from a different perspective, prepare for an easy way to get an up-close view of New York’s top attractions when you ride the Circle Line to next 10 views.

Book a Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise »

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty — Photo courtesy of Allison Tibaldi

Towering over New York Harbor from its platform on Liberty Island, this majestic statue was a gift to the American people from France. Designed by sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi with a metal frame built by Gustave Eiffel of Eiffel Tower fame, Lady Liberty was consecrated in 1886 and continues to evoke ideals of liberty. You’ll linger long enough to notice details like the seven points of her crown, one for each continent, and the torch she holds above her head in her right hand. You have plenty of time to take as many pictures as you want.

Empire State Building

Empire State Building and Midtown SkyscrapersEmpire State Building and Midtown Skyline — Photo courtesy of Julienne Schaer/NYC & Company

Once the tallest building in the world, the Empire State Building’s Art Deco architecture and towering height are favorites with residents and visitors alike. Soaring above other notable Midtown skyscrapers, Circle Line passengers get an unobstructed view of this pop culture icon who’s been featured in dozens of movies, starting with ‘King Kong’ in 1933. Each evening, the spire is lit with a dazzling color to match holidays or commemorate events.

A global trade center

One World Trade Center and DowntownOne World Trade Center and downtown skyline — Photo courtesy of Allison Tibaldi

One World Trade Center, also known as the Freedom Tower, is New York’s tallest structure. Built on the site of the World Trade Center, the boat’s generous decks and windows offer a beautiful glimpse of the imposing glass and steel facade that is an inescapable symbol of hope and rebirth.

ellis island

ellis islandEllis Island — Photo courtesy of Julienne Schaer/NYC & Company

Between 1892 and 1954, Ellis Island was the first stop for more than 12 million immigrants who came to build a new life in the United States. It’s estimated that around 40% of Americans can trace at least one ancestor to Ellis Island, making it a magnet for those looking for a connection to their family history. The Circle Line takes you nearby for an inside look at the Ellis Island National Immigration Museum, once the main building of the historic Immigration Complex.

A trio of bridges

Cruise under a bridgeCruising under a bridge — Photo courtesy of Allison Tibaldi

New York City is flooded with bridges. The Circle Line glides under three of the East River’s most beautiful sights: the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge and the Williamsburg Bridge, all connecting Manhattan to Brooklyn. As the ship glides below, you’ll see pedestrians, cyclists, cars, and even the subway pass overhead.

Hudson shipyards

Hudson Yards, the shipHudson Yards, the ship — Photo courtesy of Related Oxford/NYC & Company

As the ship passes Hudson Yards, one of New York’s newest neighborhoods, it features a dynamic panorama of the Vessel, a futuristic honeycomb structure with 154 interlocking exterior staircases. Look up to where the birds take flight and see Edge, the tallest skybridge in the Western Hemisphere, where those who don’t suffer from vertigo can gaze out from 100 stories above the ground.

small island park

small island parkLittle Island Park — Photo courtesy of Allison Tibaldi

Part of the sprawling waterfront sanctuary known as Hudson River Park, the new Little Island Park is an urban green space suspended above the water by innovative concrete planters in the whimsical shapes of giant mushrooms. Get a top view of the park’s impressive amphitheater and lush foliage as you cruise.

South Street Seaport

South Street SeaportSouth Street Seaport — Photo courtesy of Julienne Schaer/NYC & Company

With the South Street Seaport Museum, shops, restaurants and concerts on the rooftops of Pier 17 merging with some of the city’s most historic architecture, South Street Seaport is both a popular meeting place and tourist attraction. The tall ship Wavertree is permanently moored here, and Circle Line passengers can admire its traditional nautical features, including three masts and an iron hull.

Governors Island

Governors IslandGovernors Island — Photo courtesy of Kate Glicksberg/NYC & Company

Governors Island is a favorite respite for New Yorkers in search of fresh air. They hop on a ferry to pedal car-free trails and relax in a shady grove of hammocks. You’ll get a great overview of this serene oasis, including new glamping tents where visitors can spend the night, as the Circle Line passes by.

City of Jersey

Colgate ClockColgate clock — Photo courtesy of Allison Tibaldi

The Circle Line doesn’t just show New York, it gives passengers a nice glimpse of a part of New Jersey across the Hudson River. Jersey City is one of the most visually vibrant New Jersey towns you’ll pass through. Its modern skyline is punctuated by a spectacular 80-foot sculpture, Water’s Soul, an alabaster marvel depicting a person’s face with a single finger held to their lips.

The retro Colgate clock, built in 1924, is also visible. Named after the famous brand of toothpaste, this octagonal clock measures 50 feet in diameter, a nod to the Colgate factory that once stood here.

Book a Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise »

Details: Circle Line cruises of varying durations and departure times are scheduled daily. The popular Landmarks cruise offers 90 minutes of scenery as it circles around Midtown and Lower Manhattan. The 2.5-hour Best of NYC cruise circumnavigates Manhattan.

Circle Line cruises depart from Pier 83 at 42nd Street and 12th Avenue in Midtown West. If you are driving, parking at the edge of the pier is available.

If you prefer to board downtown, the Liberty Super Express Downtown Cruise departs from Slip 6 in Battery Park, offering a 50-minute ride that gets you up close to the Statue of Liberty in a jiffy.


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Which X-Men advice is the best? https://4xcircle.com/which-x-men-advice-is-the-best/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/which-x-men-advice-is-the-best/ Mutants have come a long way to get to where they are today. With the help of the X-Men, they now have an entire nation and planet to inhabit. With a nation, there must be some form of governing body to govern the mutant population and make decisions. Fortunately, Krakoa and Arakko have their own […]]]>

Mutants have come a long way to get to where they are today. With the help of the X-Men, they now have an entire nation and planet to inhabit. With a nation, there must be some form of governing body to govern the mutant population and make decisions. Fortunately, Krakoa and Arakko have their own governance mechanisms. Each of them has their own members and their own way of governing their respective mutant nations.

Krakoa’s governing body is called the Silent Council while Arakko’s is known as the Great Ring of Arakko. In Immortal X-Men #3 (written by Kieron Gillan with artists Lucas Werneck, Dijo Lima and VC’s Clayton Cowles) and in X-Men Red #3 (written by Al Ewing with artists Stefano Caselli, Federico Blee and Ariana Maher from VC) readers learn about the difficulties that each respective board faced. While ruling entire populations of mutants is no easy task, it’s time to examine the political entities behind mutant nations and determine which is more effective in terms of decision-making for mutants.


RELATED: What Can The X-Men’s Most Mysterious Metal Do?

The Silent Council was set up to be Krakoa’s governing body by Magneto, Professor X, and Moira McTaggert. The council itself is divided into four sections of three seats each. Sections are named after the four seasons and each is representative of the values ​​The Quiet Council wishes to uphold. The three seats of Autumn represent the traditional and historical figures of the mutant genre. Apocalypse, Magneto, and Professor X were the original incumbents of these seats, however, the precognitive mutant Destiny took Apocalypse’s place after the events of Sword of X while Hope Summers took Magneto’s seat after his recent retirement. The three seats of Spring are representatives of the economic interests of Krakoa. These seats are occupied by members of the Hellfire Trading Company: Emma Frost, Sebastian Shaw and Kate Pryde.


Summer’s three seats are held by former X-Men Colossus, Nightcrawler, and Storm. They represent a more empathetic and level-headed approach to solving problems. Jean Grey, aka Marvel Girl, once held the seat of Colossus, however, she left the council to reform the X-Men. The Final Division holds Winter’s three seats. Mystique, Exodus, and Mr. Sinister occupy these seats, and they’re known to tread waters on the radical and zealous sides of mutant issues. Two other people are also present at board meetings. Krakoa, the island itself, represents its own interests with the mutant Cypher, acting as its voice.


RELATED: Immortal X-Men Reveals The Omega-Level Mutant Exodus’ Final Form – And They’re Basically God

In the few years that Krakoa has been recognized as its own nation, the Silent Council has made great strides in securing mutant interests. Although the council made many good decisions, they are all overshadowed by the constant conflict between them. For example, Moira forbade the resurrection of mutants with precognitive abilities and for a long time prevented Destiny from resurrecting. Her lover, Mystique, had to go behind the council’s back and resurrect her in secret.


Eventually, Destiny was voted into the council, thanks to Mystique getting the votes she needed. After that, Magneto, Xavier, and Moira brought Emma Frost into their little cabal to try and turn things around, but Emma got angry because the trio had kept her in the dark for so long. As a result, the trio’s conspiracies with Moira were exposed to the rest of the council while Xavier and Magneto were unwell. Everyone apparently has their own agenda and doesn’t always work well in a group when it comes to making decisions.

RELATED: X-Men Red Sets the Stage for the Ultimate Mutant Game of Thrones


Meanwhile, the Great Ring of Arakko has been active for over a thousand years and operates on a much different scale. Arakko’s long history is steeped in war and violence, so it makes sense to structure a government based on these concepts. Their council is divided into four sections of three seats each, similar to the Silent Council. Additionally, seats are also given names with specific responsibilities given to whoever sits in them. The first section is called Dawn and is delayed in wartime. Isca the Undefeated holds the seat of Victor while Idyll The Future Seer holds the seat of Stalemate. Recently, Magneto won the Seat of Loss in battle from former Seat Holder Tarn the Uncaring.

The day is postponed to times of peace. Lactuca the Knower sits in the seat above us, Sobunar of the Deep sits in the seat below us, and Storm holds the highest and mightiest seat, the seat of all around us. Because of her positions, she can vote twice in some cases. There is also a section known as Dusk. The three members are consulted on matters of law, history and the arts. The last section is called Night. Its members are kept secret and have their own objectives. As Krakoa is able to represent himself, so is Arakko. As a sentient being, he is able to voice his opinions through his representative, Redroot the Forest. Unfortunately, she was captured during the X of Swords and is being held in Otherworld.


RELATED: X-Men Red’s Final Power Shift Depends On The Mutant Prophecy

Based on the overall council structure, roles, and experience, it can be inferred that the Great Ring is better suited to rule the mutant kind. He hasn’t been featured much in the X-Men comics, but from what readers have learned from the series Red X-Men, it can be inferred that backstabbing and secret conspiracies are not as prevalent among council members. Each has a specific role to play and a certain topic to consult, which ensures that everyone stays in their lane. Although they disagree on many issues, they all have respect for each other, as well as for Storm who is considered the regent of Arakko.

Of course, no governing body is without flaws, and even though the Great Ring seems inferior to the Silent Council, that doesn’t mean it’s doomed. The restructuring of the Silent Council would be a good solution to all the dramas among the members. It doesn’t help that all of the council members have formed some sort of relationship, whether as friends, enemies, or a bit of both. The story between everyone has given way to error. If the council were made up of impartial mutants with no backgrounds between them, it would prevent conspiratorial factions from forming. The Silent Council is still young, so there is hope for future reform.



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Allendale’s New Animal Mural Is Beautiful and Fun, But It Also Has a Deeper Meaning https://4xcircle.com/allendales-new-animal-mural-is-beautiful-and-fun-but-it-also-has-a-deeper-meaning/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:21:19 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/allendales-new-animal-mural-is-beautiful-and-fun-but-it-also-has-a-deeper-meaning/ Breadcrumb Links local arts Edmonton artist Josh Harnack spent two weeks painting the gray wall outside Connect Physiotherapy, turning it into a fantastical twilight journey of a lion riding a bicycle, guided by a giant goose with a necklace of petals of pink flowers. Mural artist Josh Harnack in front of his work located at […]]]>

Edmonton artist Josh Harnack spent two weeks painting the gray wall outside Connect Physiotherapy, turning it into a fantastical twilight journey of a lion riding a bicycle, guided by a giant goose with a necklace of petals of pink flowers.

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A stunning new mural has been erected in Allendale, full of deep circle of life symbolism.

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Finishing last Saturday, Edmonton artist Josh Harnack spent two weeks painting the gray wall outside Connect Physiotherapy (6316 106 St.), transforming it into a fantastical twilight journey of a lion on a bicycle, guided by a giant goose with a necklace of pink flower petals.

Monarch butterflies are inside this eerie scene, as is a squirrel clinging to the lion’s tail. Follow them, why not? — is an X-ray dove.

“I wanted it to be fun and full of childlike wonder,” says Harnack. “But also a bit adult-oriented too.

“The surreal and the unknown of what is between this space.

“My idea with this one was that it was kind of like the space between life and death, a bit of limbo. I imagined this lion on his bike ride as his journey through limbo, life and death, with the kind of goose representing the shepherd or the boatman, that’s also why he has a halo too – a guardian angel, almost.

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The artist included monarchs because they are one of his favorite creatures.

“But also because they have already gone through this life and death process as the caterpillars are reborn.”

He notes that the skeleton bird is a nod to the Grim Reaper, explaining, “Death follows us, doesn’t it? But also, the dove is a symbol of peace.

Detail of Josh Harnack's new mural at Connect Physiotherapy in Allendale.
Detail of Josh Harnack’s new mural at Connect Physiotherapy in Allendale. Photo by Fish Griwkowsky /Postmedia

Symbols come naturally, from lived life. Harnack, 28, spent five years battling cancer when he was younger, which helped him access the sense of limbo in painting.

“In the heat of chemotherapy, I felt like half my body was dead, the other half alive,” he notes.

“It started in my testicle and I had to have surgery on the last day of high school. A year later it came back to my lymph nodes and stomach, so radiation for that. Then a year later it came back into the lymph nodes, but it had moved between my lungs.

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In and out of treatment after high school — it’s been clear for six years now — Harnack followed his love of acting and musical theatre, moving west, attending Vancouver Film School and getting an agent. His artistic career kind of slipped out of carpentry almost accidentally there.

“When I moved to Vancouver,” he says, “the cost of living was so high that I couldn’t really afford to go out all the time and do all these fun things with my classmates, so I found myself sitting at home in my apartment painting a lot.

“Then, you know, I was talking about it and I was selling one here, I was selling one there, for like $40,” he laughs. “And I got better and better.”

During this time, he auditioned hard whenever he could. “I would be called up, and by the 11th hour I knew I had passed and got that game.

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“But my agent would call me and say, ‘Hey, Josh. They decided to go with someone else they really liked because he had longer hair. Or brown eyes. Or something like that.”

He noticed a recurring theme: optics, basically.

“At the end of the day, I didn’t want my professional career to be determined by my appearance. I wanted it to be determined by the skill of the craft.

“I found art to be the exact opposite, where it was all about work, and I started pursuing art full time.”

Harnack moved back home and studied Graphic Design and Visual Communication at NAIT, graduating in 2018. Since then, in addition to his smaller scale paintings, he has done 10 interior murals at various businesses around town. , including at Dealcloser in the Mercer Building and Bloom Hair Studio at 2920 Calgary Trail.

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The untitled mural on Connect is Harnack’s fourth exterior wall, others at Emmy Deveaux (6924 104 St.) and RADO Alley in Old Strathcona.

He soon has more work in the residences of the Louvre and in Vegreville this summer.

The new lion and goose mural was made possible by Connect and the city’s Community Mural Grant program and, indeed, created an instant sense of community when Harnack painted it.

“People can see it from their front yard, so they walk around, bring their dogs and chat with me,” Harnack laughs. “Bus drivers were honking their horns as they passed and people were shouting from their car windows or from the bike lane.”

Connect owner Ruben San Martin was also impressed.

“The fact that someone can even paint something in such detail is just mind-boggling to me,” he says. “Rather than getting something to promote the business, we just asked him to paint something that people in the community and the nearby school would enjoy.”

The plan worked. “There were eight or nine people standing there one time and I was just painting and they found out they were all neighbors and had never spoken to each other before,” Harnack says. “So it was a very direct way of community engagement, where now these people are engaging with each other – pretty cool.”

Visit harnack.ca to see other works by the artist, and take the time to visit the new wall to gaze blithely at infinity with the help of a giant goose — it’s really worth it.

fgriwkowsky@postmedia.com

@fisheyefoto

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Curtain Call: Actor Austin Miller Comes Full Circle in Oregon Cabaret’s ‘The Full Monty’ – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://4xcircle.com/curtain-call-actor-austin-miller-comes-full-circle-in-oregon-cabarets-the-full-monty-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/curtain-call-actor-austin-miller-comes-full-circle-in-oregon-cabarets-the-full-monty-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Austin Miller as Ethan in “The Full Monty”, one of many unemployed steelworkers who decide to try a Chippendale-style act to raise some quick cash. Oregon Cabaret Theater photo by Steve Sutfin Austin Miller is seen here as Henrik in “A Little Night Music,” starring Kristen Calvin Gordon in a 2020 Camelot Theater production. You […]]]>

Austin Miller as Ethan in “The Full Monty”, one of many unemployed steelworkers who decide to try a Chippendale-style act to raise some quick cash. Oregon Cabaret Theater photo by Steve Sutfin

Austin Miller is seen here as Henrik in “A Little Night Music,” starring Kristen Calvin Gordon in a 2020 Camelot Theater production. You can see him in “The Full Monty,” opening June 30 at the Oregon Cabaret Theater. Photo submitted.

Ashland actor Austin Miller is part of the cast of “The Full Monty,” which runs June 30 through September 4 at the Oregon Cabaret Theater. Photo submitted.

By Jim Flint

for Time

When Austin Miller was a kid, he played the kid (Nathan) in the musical version of “The Full Monty.”

When the Oregon Cabaret Theater’s production of the musical begins on June 30, Miller comes full circle as one of the unemployed steelworkers who tries to strip for a quick buck.

“Playing one of the adults on the show this time around is really special to me,” the 27-year-old Ashland actor said.

In the Cabaret production, Miller plays Ethan, not the sharpest tool in the box.

“He’s absolutely aware of how little talent he has,” Miller said, “but he’s always willing to try and strip down because what has he got to lose? He’s very positive, very kind and very dumb. I’m really looking forward to playing the part and the show in general.

The musical has been nominated for 10 Tony Awards and will run until September 4 at Cabaret d’Ashland. For tickets, go to oregoncabaret.com.

Born and raised in Simi Valley, Calif., Miller has performance DNA in his genes. Her mother is a choir singer and her father is a bluegrass guitarist.

“They encouraged my interest in acting early on and got me involved in local theater at a young age,” he said.

Occasionally, Miller would join his father on trips with his bluegrass band.

“I have memories of sitting around a campfire, playing with them on a violin, even though I was terrible,” he said.

“These memories stick with me because of the collaboration and harmony with other players. Well, not literally in tune!”

A bit of nepotism got him his first gig on stage. He was cast in a half-staged Christmas opera called “Amahl and the Night Visitors” in which his mother’s choir was involved.

“I played my mother’s child,” Miller said. “For a certain scene, the director asked me to pull my mother across the scene.”

When the time was right, he tugged his mother’s arm so hard that she almost fell.

“The director told me I just had to make it look like I was pulling my mom’s arm. That’s when I started learning what acting was.

Miller has been doing acting since she was 8 years old and attended a performing arts high school.

Miller’s college career was short.

“I’m very proud of the one semester I took at community college,” he said, “and the three courses I took. It was a formative period in my life, for sure,” he said, tongue firmly planted in his cheek.

Since then, acting has been his raison d’être.

“It’s the only thing I know how to do,” he said. “It’s been my life for as long as I can remember. It is the place where I feel fully at ease.

His first paid gig was as an extra on the Christmas episode of the TV show “7th Heaven” in 2006, singing Christmas carols. He and the other kids recorded their songs in advance in a recording studio, then lip-synced to their own voices on the day of filming.

“I always look forward to seeing the annual royalty check for that one: eight dollars. Yes thank you very much!”

When asked what kind of jobs he does between gigs, he said it’s probably more accurate to change it, with his theatrical work filling in the gaps between day jobs.

“I have always worked in customer service. I look forward to the day when these jobs fill the gaps between theater gigs, instead of the other way around.

One of his proudest accomplishments before coming to Ashland was originally a role in a two-man play adapting the works of Edgar Allen Poe, which resulted in an award nomination alongside Nick Offerman.

“Nick and I both lost, but we accepted that,” he said with a laugh.

Another memorable period was when he played Igor in “Young Frankenstein, the Musical” for the Simi Valley Cultural Arts Center in 2014.

“While playing the dumbest character I’ve ever played, on the weekends I was simultaneously rehearsing during the week as Jamie in ‘The Last Five Years’ (about a troubled relationship), which contains some of the least silly scenes I’ve ever acted.

Playing Igor in “Young Frankenstein” was a challenge. He may be a silly character, but Miller describes the role as one of the toughest he’s tackled.

“I was the tallest cast member, playing the shortest character on the show,” he explained. “I spent the whole show hunched over to come down four feet tall. I had to do it by running, jumping and dancing around the stage. I left the stage at intermission and I lay on the floor, exhausted.

Miller moved to Rogue Valley about five years ago. He had visited Ashland several times as a child and then as an adult.

“I realized how much I click with the city and how amazing it is to have such quality theater in such a small community,” he said. “It was the right thing to do.”

In addition to his work at Oregon Cabaret, he has also performed at Camelot Theater in Talent and for the Collaborative Theater Project in Medford.

He’s open to almost any role, but there are a few on his to-do list.

“I’ve always wanted to play Jeff in ‘{show title}’, which is a musical that I find hilarious – and the scarecrow in ‘The Wizard of Oz’, just for all the jelly physical comedy involved.”

Offstage, Miller is an avid Dungeons & Dragons player, having run games for his friends for many years.

After running “The Full Monty,” he hopes to continue doing more work for the Oregon cabaret.

“I always enjoy my time at Cabaret and I’m grateful to be able to continue working with them.”

Where does he see himself in 10 years?

“I have cats who I hope are still alive by then, and I have a girlfriend who I hope is more than a girlfriend by then,” he said. -he declares. “And I hope that I will spend every day in a theater.”

Best advice for up-and-coming actors?

“I want every actor who’s unsure of their talent to remember that it’s enough to look like you’re pulling your mother’s arm.”

Contact Ashland writer Jim Flint at jimflint.ashland@yahoo.com.


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Baylor’s ‘Circle Mirror Transformation’ examines the small changes in life | Arts & Theater https://4xcircle.com/baylors-circle-mirror-transformation-examines-the-small-changes-in-life-arts-theater/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/baylors-circle-mirror-transformation-examines-the-small-changes-in-life-arts-theater/ Asking an actor to pretend to be a bed or a tree is one of those seemingly goofy exercises meant to defrost inhibition and spark inventiveness. In the case of playwright Annie Baker’s “Circle Mirror Transformation,” what seems silly on the surface causes real changes in a class of amateurs, with bittersweet effect. His 2009 […]]]>

Asking an actor to pretend to be a bed or a tree is one of those seemingly goofy exercises meant to defrost inhibition and spark inventiveness.

In the case of playwright Annie Baker’s “Circle Mirror Transformation,” what seems silly on the surface causes real changes in a class of amateurs, with bittersweet effect.

His 2009 play, presented this weekend by the Baylor Theater, imagines a six-week community theater workshop in the small town of Shirley, Vermont. Classroom instructor Marty believes in theater and its therapeutic value. Her eclectic class, however, isn’t so sure, starting with Marty’s husband, James. There’s Lauren, a 16-year-old girl who wants to become an actress. Theresa, a former actress, comes from New York and tries to recover from a bad relationship there. Schultz, a carpenter, is recovering from a recent divorce after 20 years of marriage.

So what could go wrong if Marty asked them to pretend to be a baseball glove? Or each other?

For Baylor University graduate student and director Lucas Skjaret, the play is an insightful example of how “every moment helps us become the next person. All these moments are in our circle.

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Skjaret said the play is a challenge for actors because it shows characters transformed over time by little things. “It’s a marathon for artists,” he said.

A “small but mighty” high school drama department opened Skjaret’s eyes to what a director does and how storytelling is shaped on stage. He earned degrees in theater and Scandinavian studies at the University of North Dakota, then went to the Ibsen Center for Studies at the University of Oslo. He came to Baylor after 10 years on the Minneapolis theater scene, during which time he founded and directed the Market Garden Theater.

After completing his Masters in Directing, he hopes to teach at the college level.

What audiences will find in “Circle Mirror Transformation,” which opens Thursday in Baylor’s black box, Theater 11, is a piece that touches multiple emotions, from humor to “heartfelt moments and poignant silences,” did he declare.


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Elon University / Performing Arts / Alumni of Dance https://4xcircle.com/elon-university-performing-arts-alumni-of-dance/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 01:15:19 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/elon-university-performing-arts-alumni-of-dance/ Dancing Elders Danielle ‘Dani’ Biggs ’15 BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration Director of Development at Dancing Classrooms in New York and Zumba Instructor Pursue an MA in Educational Policy and Leadership from American University Abby Williams Menton ’14 BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration, Minor in Communications Performance Credits: The […]]]>

Dancing Elders

Danielle ‘Dani’ Biggs ’15

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Director of Development at Dancing Classrooms in New York and Zumba Instructor

Pursue an MA in Educational Policy and Leadership from American University


Abby Williams Menton ’14

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration, Minor in Communications

Performance Credits: The Coincidentals, Jamm ‘n Honey, Heather Carpenter, Sara Tourek and Jason Aryeh

Choreographic credits: Founder and artistic director of Cattywampus Dance; over 15 original works featured at Full Circle Festival, Delve Dance Festival, Bates Dance Festival and Dance Chicago’s New Moves Series

Pursuing her Masters in Dance at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Rachel Perlman Clac ’10

BFA in Dance and Minor in Business Administration

Performance Credits: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (domestic and international tours), West Side Story, 42nd Street, Mary Poppins, A Christmas Carol, Singin’ in the Rain, Prince of Egypt, Matilda, Cinderella, The Aluminum Show (tour International), Royal Caribbean Cruise, Holland America Cruise (Dancing Captain)


Abby Corrigan ’18

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Performance credits: Summation Dance Company, Lila Artists, VALLETO Dance

Choreographic credits: Movement Festival, WAXworks Showcase, Dairy Arts Center (commissioned)

Program Coordinator for the Independent Study Program at Peridance Center in Manhattan


Julie Crothers ’14

BFA in dance

Performance credits: AXIS Dance Company, Sarah Bush Dance Project, Tara Pilbrow Dance, Wax Poet(s) and Kickbal

Choreography Credits: Solo works performed on numerous stages in the San Francisco Bay Area, Selected Guest Artist, Artist-in-Residence and Guest Choreographer for a number of dance organizations.

Dance Magazine named her one of “25 to watch” in 2020


Rachel Linsky ’19

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Performance credits: Connections Dance Theatre, KAIROS Dance Theater

Choreography Credits: Artist-in-Residence at Chelsea Theater Works, One Night’s Work “Zachor: Honoring WWII Holocaust Survivors Through Dance”

Awards: New England Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Combined Jewish Philanthropies Fellowship

Educational credits: Urbanity Dance, The Dance Academy of Siagel Productions, Velocity Dance Company, Apollinaire Play Lab


Allie Lochary ’09

BFA in dance

Performance credits: Summation Dance Company, Oliver Steele, In-Sight Dance Company, Time Chester Dance, The Kearns Dance Project, Martha Connerton/Kinetic Works

Choreography credits: North Carolina Dance Alliance, ACDA

Certified Pilates teacher in schools around New York


Lauren Renck Manning’13

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance credits: Radio City Music Hall Rockettes, various professional festivals across the country and Europe

Choreography credits: ACDA Adjudication Concert

Advertising Account Manager at Dance Magazine


Annie Marx ’20

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance Credits: Mal Ped Dance Collective, Angelo Egarese, Ashley “Robi” Robicheaux, Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company, Jason Aryeh, Justin Tornow, Jen Guy Metcalf, Kira Blazik, Lauren Kearns, Matt Pardo, Renay Aumiller

Marketing Assistant at the Joyce Theater in Manhattan


Lucas Melfi ’17

BFA in dance

Performance credits: Gaspard Louis, Summation Dance Company, Trent Williams, Diane Coburn Bruning, TERRANOVA Dance Theatre, The Kearns Dance Project, RAD | Renay Aumiller Danse, The Dance Cure and Gerri Houlihan

Choreographic credits: American Dance Guild Festival, EMERGENCE Festival


Kalie-Ann Nassoura ’21

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance Credits: Starring role in Disney Channel Original Series, Shook, The Weeknd, Nike, New Kids on the Block, Sony Music, Paris Fashion Week, Lil Xan


Alyssa Needham ’19

BFA in Dance and Communication Minor

Talent agency: Go2Talent

Performance credits: Helado Negro, Brooke Alexx, Crossrope, Lumin Skincare

Pilates Instructor at Bodyline in Beverly Hills


Alex Pepper ’11

BFA in Dance and Musical Theater

Dance Credits: South Pacific (National Tour), Kennedy Center, Walnut Street, ArtPark, CPCC, Fulton Theater

Acting Credits: SNL, Law & Order: SVU, Independent Films

Directing credits: Doritos Commercial (top 10 2015 Super Bowl finalists)

Director of Photography at Peppermatic Pictures in Atlanta, GA


Helen Phelan ’13

BFA in Dance and BA in Psychology

Performance credits: Celebrity Cruise Line

Founder: Helen Phelan Studio, a Pilates-based studio that promotes positivity, self-care, body appreciation, intuitive exercise, and holistic health

Awards: Women’s Health 2021 Fit Tech Award for “Best Neutral Body Workouts”


Maya sank ’16

BFA in dance

Continuing Education: Studied with Vertigo Dance Company in Jerusalem, Israel

Founder: Maya Moves, offering personalized private dance lessons to adults and children


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The film ‘Seeds of Greenwood’ features the first class Thunder Fellows; The Circle Cinema screening is Saturday | Local News https://4xcircle.com/the-film-seeds-of-greenwood-features-the-first-class-thunder-fellows-the-circle-cinema-screening-is-saturday-local-news/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 19:20:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/the-film-seeds-of-greenwood-features-the-first-class-thunder-fellows-the-circle-cinema-screening-is-saturday-local-news/ The Thunder Fellows after-school program was launched, Oklahoma City Thunder general manager Sam Presti explained after his 2020 visit to the Tulsa Race massacre site, ‘to help bridge the opportunity gap’ for black students from Tulsa. The first Thunder Fellows class is made up of 26 9th and 10th graders from schools across the metro […]]]>

The Thunder Fellows after-school program was launched, Oklahoma City Thunder general manager Sam Presti explained after his 2020 visit to the Tulsa Race massacre site, ‘to help bridge the opportunity gap’ for black students from Tulsa.

The first Thunder Fellows class is made up of 26 9th and 10th graders from schools across the metro area. Based in a downtown space near ONEOK Field, the program includes a data and analytics curriculum and hands-on experiences that could lead to careers in the sports, entertainment, or technology industries.

When the students applied to be members of the first class Thunder Fellows, they did not expect to see their faces and their experiences on a movie screen.

But as the students were followed for months by media personnel and OKC Thunder cameras, the result is “The Seeds of Greenwood” – a 50-minute documentary starring Crossover Prep student Reece Robinson and his friends. fellow Thunder Fellows classmates, as well as Thunder Fellows staff: Executive Director Cedric Ikpo, Program Manager LaKena Whitley and Operations Coordinator Ricky Graham.

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At 2 p.m. Saturday, free and open to the public, the film will be screened at the Circle Cinema. Thunder Fellow students and their families got their first look at the OKC Thunder Films production, which includes original music composed and performed by artists from Oklahoma City’s Notis Studios.

Presti and Mike Johnson, now the head of a creative artist agency, were childhood friends in Massachusetts and remain close today. They are members of the nine-person Thunder Fellows Advisory Board.

The Greenwood movie includes Presti and Johnson discussing the importance of a Thunder Fellows-like opportunity. There are also home movie footage of them playing soccer and basketball as kids.

From a Thunder press release: “A century after the Tulsa Race Massacre, ‘Seeds of Greenwood’ explores how today’s generation is planted and nurtured in the fertile soil of Tulsa’s historic Greenwood neighborhood. “

Within the Thunder organization, Dan Mahoney explained, there was a desire to chronicle the first Thunder Fellows school year before the filmmakers even had a sense of the students’ personal stories.

Said Mahoney, Thunder vice president in charge of broadcast and corporate communications: “Would these kids be open to being filmed? We just felt that this unique first cohort of Thunder Fellows was an important story to tell.

Most of the filmmaking was done by Michael Zubach, the Thunder’s videographer and “Seeds of Greenwood” director; and Paris Lawson and Nick Gallo, who are secondary Thunder TV reporters and digital contributors.

“When they came to Tulsa and watched these kids,” Mahoney explained, “they identified Reece (as a compelling figure). Along the way, they learned his routine: getting up before sunrise and riding in a city bus to school.

“That’s when Zubach came back and said, ‘Yeah, I’d like to follow him. The decision was made that this would be a great way to open the film.

The documentary ends with Reece Robinson as a passenger on a shuttle, returning home mid-evening after his day started at 5:50 a.m.

“There was intentional storytelling there — to show what his journey looks like every day,” said Matt Tumbleson, Thunder’s vice president of basketball communications and engagement.

While Mahoney and Tumbleson serve as executive producers on the film, Ikgo, Lawson, and Gallo get producer credits.

Ikpo’s response to the film: “It’s surreal.”

“It’s a great opportunity to tell the story of creation,” he said. “I am very happy with the film and the reception has been fantastic, both from the public and from the children. We wanted the children to feel good. »

About 60 students applied to be members of the first class of Thunder Fellows. Because awareness is so much greater now, Ikpo expects a much heavier response on apps.

“The recruitment process is taking place this summer,” Ikpo said. “We are now in a crossroads — evaluating the success of the first year, looking at what worked well and what didn’t, and trying to replicate what worked.

“We are not yet able to accept all applicants, so we will need a rigorous vetting process. We want to stay engaged with the original cohort members, but we’re looking forward to some new faces.

“I am delighted to see the level of interest in this year’s selection process.”

For the 2022-23 school year, as explained on the Thunder Fellows website, the program is open to black students in the ninth, 10th, 11th and 12th grades “based on availability.”

More information can be found at www.thunderfellows.org. The application deadline is September 2.

bill.haisten@tulsaworld.com


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City Life Org – A Ring of Fire by Paul Maheke for Public Audience will be shown on the High Line June 28-30 https://4xcircle.com/city-life-org-a-ring-of-fire-by-paul-maheke-for-public-audience-will-be-shown-on-the-high-line-june-28-30/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:41:33 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/city-life-org-a-ring-of-fire-by-paul-maheke-for-public-audience-will-be-shown-on-the-high-line-june-28-30/ Paul Maheke, A Ring of Fire for a Public Audience (2018). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2018. Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by the Chisenhale Gallery and the Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg. Photo: Mark Blower. This will be the first American presentation of the performance and Maheke’s first public performance in New York. […]]]>

Paul Maheke, A Ring of Fire for a Public Audience (2018). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2018. Produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Commissioned by the Chisenhale Gallery and the Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg. Photo: Mark Blower.

This will be the first American presentation of the performance and Maheke’s first public performance in New York.

High Line Art announces A Ring of Fire for a Public Audience, a performance by artist Paul Maheke. The presentation of The High Line will be the first time this compelling performance has been presented in North America, finding new resonances in the unique public space as three performers explore the body as a historical archive. Performances of A Ring of Fire for Public Hearing will take place on the High Line at 14th Street beginning at 7 p.m. on June 28, 29 and 30, 2022. A Ring of Fire for Public Hearing is hosted by Melanie Kress, High Line Art Associate Curator.

Paul Maheke is an artist working in performance, video, sculpture and installation. Her performances are mainly based on dance and movement, often accompanied by voice-overs or poetic scripts; they explore the ways in which bodies can act as archives of history and personal experience.

A Ring of Fire for a Public Audience expands on Maheke’s ongoing engagement with the potential of the body as an archive; the performance deals with the formation of history, memory and identity. In the work, three performers (Morgan “Emme” Bryant, Lucy Hollier, and Rafaelle Kennibol-Cox) channel different characters as if possessed by ghostly entities. Their movements and dialogue explore hypervisibility and erasure as they unfold in historical marginalization and contemporary political movements.

On the High Line in the 14th Street Passage, the artwork is presented outdoors for the first time, opening up the experience to passers-by and an avid audience. As with many of his works, Maheke invites performers to activate the unique architecture of the space, fusing props, costumes and decor. Her choreography blends movement references drawn from pop culture, postmodern art history and contemporary music, drawing the viewer through the passage with layers of movement, speech and music.

“Paul Maheke is a captivating choreographer whose work to date has been seen primarily by audiences in Europe; it’s very exciting to bring this performance to New York and North America for the first time,” said Melanie Kress, Associate Curator of High Line Art. “Paul’s work asks important questions about what it means to be a body on stage, and how one person is able to contain many shared and overlapping stories in a single gesture. It encourages us to reflect on what is seen and what is not seen, both in a single person’s performance, but also in our broader cultures and histories.

A Ring of Fire for a Public Audience was commissioned by the Chisenhale Gallery, London, England and the Vleeshal Center for Contemporary Art, Middelburg, The Netherlands.

Performances are free and open to the public; visitors are encouraged to RSVP online. The work lasts about 45 minutes. The closest entrances to the High Line for the show are located at Gansevoort Street and 14th Street. The nearest elevator is located on 14th Street near 10th Avenue.

All people with disabilities are encouraged to attend. To request additional information regarding accessibility or program accommodation, please contact Constanza Valenzuela (constanza.valenzuela@thehighline.org) at least five days prior to the event. Program venues are wheelchair accessible and ASL interpretation can be arranged for the performance on Wednesday, June 28, 2022. The rain date for ASL interpretation is Thursday, June 29, 2022.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Paul Maheke (born in 1985 in Brive-la-Gaillarde, France) lives and works in Montpellier, France. Her work has been featured in solo presentations at The Renaissance Society, Chicago, Illinois (2021); Pinault Collection, Paris, France (2021); and South London Art Gallery, London, England (2016). He has participated in group exhibitions and festivals at institutions such as ICA Miami, Florida (2019); Center Pompidou, Paris, France (2018); Tate Modern, London, England (2017); and Serpentine Galleries, London, England (2016). It has been featured in major international exhibitions including Glasgow International, Scotland (2021); 58th Venice Biennale, Italy (2019); Baltic Triennial 13, Estonia (2019); and Manifesta 12, Palermo, Italy (2018).

ABOUT HIGH LINE ART
Founded in 2009, High Line Art commissions and produces a wide range of artwork on the High Line, including site-specific commissions, exhibitions, performances, video programs and a series of panel interventions. display. Led by Cecilia Alemani, Director and Chief Curator of Donald R. Mullen, Jr. of High Line Art, and presented by High Line, the arts program invites artists to think about creative ways to engage with architecture, unique history and design. of the park and to foster a productive dialogue with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape. For more information on High Line Art, please visit thehighline.org/art.

ABOUT THE HIGH LINE
The High Line is both a non-profit organization and a public park located on the West Side of Manhattan. Through our work with communities on and off the High Line, we are dedicated to reinventing public spaces to create connected and healthy neighborhoods and cities.

Built on an elevated historic rail line, the High Line was always meant to be more than a park. You can stroll through the gardens, view artwork, catch a performance, enjoy food or drink, or connect with friends and neighbors, all while enjoying a unique perspective of New York City.

Nearly 100% of our annual budget comes from donations. The High Line is owned by the City of New York and we operate under a license agreement with NYC Parks.

For more information, visit thehighline.org and follow us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram.

SUPPORT
Main support for High Line Art comes from Amanda and Don Mullen. Major support for High Line Art is provided by Shelley Fox Aarons and Philip E. Aarons, The Brown Foundation, Inc. and Charina Endowment Fund. Project support is provided by Charlotte Feng Ford and Vivian and James Zelter. Additional support is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. High Line Art is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council for the Arts with support from Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature, and the Department of Cultural Affairs of New York City in partnership with the New York City Council.

@HighLineArtNYC @paulmaheke #Afirecircleforapublicearing



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MAGIC CIRCLE returns to West Michigan after a two-year hiatus https://4xcircle.com/magic-circle-returns-to-west-michigan-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 03:40:12 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/magic-circle-returns-to-west-michigan-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ Circle Theater, West Michigan’s go-to destination for exceptional theatrical arts in an intimate setting, announced a reimagined Magic Circle, sponsored by Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Lainie’s Angels and Cheryl Grant Real Estate. Traditionally, this annual family show features classic children’s productions. In 2022, Magic Circle will bring storytelling to children’s fingertips, taking character […]]]>

Circle Theater, West Michigan’s go-to destination for exceptional theatrical arts in an intimate setting, announced a reimagined Magic Circle, sponsored by Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Lainie’s Angels and Cheryl Grant Real Estate.

Traditionally, this annual family show features classic children’s productions. In 2022, Magic Circle will bring storytelling to children’s fingertips, taking character designs from local children at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital and creating unique productions based on their designs. Led by Emily Diener, this event will take place inside the Performing Arts Center located on the campus of Aquinas College.

Dogs Love Cupcakes: The Incredible True Story of the Life and Times of Jeff – Jeff doesn’t like a lot of things, but he does like inventions. Angered when the townspeople prepare for the annual bake sale fundraiser, he seeks some peace and quiet. All he wants is to work on his new invention. He doesn’t get along with most people, let alone love them. After seeing how others in his life treat him even though he’s a big grump, Jeff comes to learn that his old way of thinking is something to leave behind, and it doesn’t cost a thing. just be nice.

Character creation by Emma, ​​Levi, Violet, and Griffin. Story and screenplay by Don Wilson.

When your child has a serious health condition, they become the center of your world. You want to know your child is getting focused attention and the latest treatments and supports. At Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, they fight for every child. With more than 350 pediatric specialists and subspecialists, 10 Years of US News and Report national rankings, and innovations that attract patients from around the world, they are committed to replacing fear with hope and doubt with answers. We believe in the possibility of every child’s future. Because it’s only impossible until it’s not.

Lainie’s Angels was started by a mother and father who had an experience they don’t want other families to have. When their 10-year-old daughter was diagnosed with cancer, they discovered that while there were many good doctors, nurses and counselors to help her, no one could focus on the family’s needs. They decided to start a foundation to help other families by providing a network of people like them who had been through the process, knew the ropes and understood the pain, and could offer the benefit of their experience to families in need. . And they decided to name the organization after their daughter, Lainie (1988-2000).

Cheryl Grant is the Team Leader of Cheryl Grant’s real estate team at Keller Williams North. Cheryl and her team are licensed real estate agents representing clients in Grand Rapids and throughout West Michigan. Since 2004, Cheryl and her team have helped hundreds of people buy and sell homes in neighborhoods such as Grand Rapids, East Grand Rapids, Ada, Cascade, Caledonia, Kentwood, Grandville and Rockford. HomeLight ranks Cheryl in the top 2% of agents in Grand Rapids for successfully selling homes and as one of the top agents for selling homes quickly. Cheryl’s team was recently named one of America’s Top Real Estate Teams and continues to be one of Keller Williams North’s Top Production Teams. The team has also won Angie’s List Super Service Award 7 years in a row.

Imagination takes center stage with this three-night event from June 28-30, 2022, for a family-friendly experience! Tickets are $12 at circletheatre.org.

For more information about The Circle Theatre’s Magic Circle, 2022 season, to purchase tickets, or to find other ways to support the Circle Theatre, please call the box office at 616.456.6656 or visit circletheatre.org.


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